Tagged: Low Country Dermatology Savannah

Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology

The Dark Side of Tanning

The Dark Side of Tanning
by Dr. Corinne Howington

There’s nothing healthy about a tan. Simply put, a tan equals your skin cells in trauma trying to protect themselves from cancer. Just one sun-damaged cell can initiate the onset of melanoma, which can get into the bloodstream and spread. Even if melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, is cut out, cancer may reappear months or years later, often in the lung, liver or brain.

Melanoma is a cancer of the melanocyte cells in the epidermis of the skin. These are the cells that make the melanin that results in skin color. It is also the most serious and dangerous type of skin cancer because it can spread easily to other organs in the body. But since the sun’s UV rays cause 95 percent of all melanomas, the good news is that melanoma is largely preventable by avoiding over exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

While this is an important message for adults to heed for themselves, it is even more critical for their children. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, just a few serious sunburns or trips to the tanning bed can increase a young person’s risk of skin cancer later in life. Parents should know, too, that it can take as little as 15 minutes for unprotected skin to be damaged by the sun’s UV rays and that it can take up to 12 hours for skin to show the full effect of sun exposure.

Here are five easy ways to avoid the dark side of tanning:

1. Seek shade. The strength of UV radiation is highest in the four-hour period around noon. That would be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or, during daylight savings time, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The best thing you can do for your skin is to plan your day to get out of the sun or seek shade when the sun is high in the sky.

2. Protective clothing. Wear clothing that covers as much skin as possible, especially your shoulders, arms and legs. Choose loose fitting, closely woven fabrics that cast a dense shadow when held up to the light.

3. Broad-brimmed hat. A hat with a wide brim is a great way to protect the top of your head and also your neck, ears and face. These are parts of the body where skin cancer often occurs.

4. Sunglasses. The most effective way to protect your eyes is to wear sunglasses that are labeled “UV400” or “100% UV Protection” and wrap around the sides of the face. Darker lenses do not provide better eye protection. In fact, lens color does not matter at all.

5. Sunscreen. Used properly, sunscreens are effective in preventing sunburn. This means generously applying SPF30 broad spectrum sunscreen to your skin 20 minutes before you head outdoors and re-applying every two hours. Studies have shown that SPF30 sunscreen decreases your chances of developing melanoma by 80 percent.

Sunscreen should never be used to extend the amount of time you spend in the sun and should not be used to help get a tan. You should also be aware that some drugs and medical conditions can make you more vulnerable to UV damage. These include Retin-A skin cream, antibiotics and cataracts.

Too much UV exposure may also result in structural damage to the skin – burning or scarring in the short term and premature aging or skin cancer in the long-term.

People with fair skin and light-colored eyes are usually more vulnerable to the sun’s harmful rays, but melanomas can occur in anyone. A July 2016 study in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology showed it is more deadly in people with darker skin. African American patients were most likely to be diagnosed with melanoma in its later stages than any other group in the study, and they also had the worst prognosis and the lowest overall survival rate.

Melanoma can develop anywhere on the body, including places that do not receive frequent sun exposure, and is likely to have a similar appearance to a mole. Unlike a mole, however, a melanoma will usually grow larger and become more irregular in shape and color. If you’re concerned about a mole or lesion on your body, talk to your doctor and learn the ABCDE rule, which is a useful guide for detecting potentially dangerous moles on your skin. Look for moles that are asymmetrical (not the same on both sides), have irregular borders, have changed color, are 0.5 centimeters or larger in diameter or have changed in size, shape, color or height. If you are worried about a mole or see any of the signs described above, see your doctor right away.

Dr. Corinne Howington, of Low Country Dermatology, is a board certified dermatologist, with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology.

 

Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology

Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology

Low Country Dermatology Presents Donations to the Ronald McDonald House of the Coastal Empire

Low Country Dermatology Presents Donations to the Ronald McDonald House of the Coastal Empire

(SAVANNAH, GA) For the third consecutive year, Low Country Dermatology held a holiday donation drive to collect needed supplies for the Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) of the Coastal Empire and to help stock a “holiday store” for RMHC families. The donations were presented to Bill Sorochak, executive director of RMHC.

“The stress of having a child in the hospital is often overwhelming, and having to think about buying holiday gifts has to be the farthest thing from a parent’s mind,” said Dr. Corinne Howington, who owns Low Country Dermatology. “I’m so thankful for my patients, community and staff who brought so many items into our office. It really makes a difference.”

Items donated to the holiday store allow parents who are staying at the Ronald McDonald House to pick out presents for their children and other family members.

Collected items included: stuffed animals, bath toys, teething toys, board books and interactive toys (blocks, rattles), nerf and Fisher Price toys, board games, toy trucks, dolls and dress-up clothes, adult coloring books and colored pencils, books, snacks, high efficiency free and clear laundry detergent and dryer sheets, hand sanitizer and hand soap, disposable bowls, plates utensils and gloves, trash bags, sponges and liquid dish soap, tissues, and disinfectant wipes.

“We are dedicated to providing a ‘home away from home’ for seriously ill or injured children and their families who are receiving treatment at area hospitals,” said Sorochak. “Every donation helps ensure we can stretch the dollars that support our 13-bedroom house in Savannah to better serve the families who depend on us. We are so grateful she has stepped up year after year to help them.”

The mission of the Ronald McDonald House Charities is to create, find and support programs that enhance the health and well-being of children and families. The house operates on a waiting list most of the year. For more information, visit http://www.rmhccoastalempire.org/about-our-house.html

Low Country Dermatology is located at 310 Eisenhower Dr. Suite 12A Savannah, GA 31406. For more information, visit lcderm.com.

(LEFT TO RIGHT) Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology presents donations collected for the Ronald McDonald House to executive director Bill Sorochak

 

ABOUT LOW COUNTRY DERMATOLOGY
Low Country Dermatology specializes in the treatment of adult and pediatric diseases of the skin, hair and nails. Dr. Corinne Howington is a board certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. Low Country Dermatology is located at 310 Eisenhower Dr. Suite 12A Savannah, GA 31406. For more information, visit lcderm.com.

Media Contact:
Cecilia Russo
Cecilia Russo Marketing
info@crussomarketing.com
912-665-0005

Low Country Dermatology Holds Donation Drive for the Ronald McDonald House of the Coastal Empire

(SAVANNAH, GA) For the third consecutive year, Low Country Dermatology will hold a holiday donation drive to collect needed supplies for the Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Coastal Empire and to help stock a “holiday store” for RMHC families.
Low Country Dermatology will accept donations through 5 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 19.

“The stress of having a child in the hospital is often overwhelming, and having to think about buying holiday gifts has to be the farthest thing from a parent’s mind,” said Dr. Corinne Howington, who owns Low Country Dermatology. “That’s why I’m asking my patients and our community to help spread some cheer to these deserving families.”

Items donated to the holiday store will allow parents who are staying at the Ronald McDonald House to pick out presents for their children and other family members.

Bill Sorochak, executive director of Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Coastal Empire, offered several gift ideas, including:

  • Infants/toddlers: Stuffed animals, musical instruments, bath toys, teething toys, board books and interactive toys (blocks, rattles)
  • School-aged children: Nerf and Fisher Price toys; Legos and board games; toy trucks; dolls and dress-up clothes; puzzles and arts and craft kits.
  • Teenagers: Footballs, volleyballs, basketballs; journals; adult coloring books and colored pencils; books and video games.
  • Adults: Robes and slippers; Bath and Body Works lotions and sprays; books & interactive journals; electric razors and gift cards for coffee, movies and meals.

Wishlist items to support the operations of the house include: quick meals (soups, Ramen noodles, mac and cheese); individually packaged snacks, boxes of cereal and drinks; high efficiency free and clear laundry detergent and dryer sheets; hand sanitizer and hand soap; bathroom, shower and toilet bowl cleaners; Swiffer Wet Jet fluid and pads; disposable bowls, plates utensils and gloves; 33-gallon trash bags; 60-watt CFL light bulbs; toothbrushes and toothpaste, dishwasher tablets, sponges and liquid dish soap; Febreze; gallon zip-lock bags; tissues; disinfectant wipes and gas/grocery gift cards.

“We are dedicated to providing a ‘home away from home’ for seriously ill or injured children and their families who are receiving treatment at area hospitals,” said Sorochak. “Every item donated by Dr. Howington, her clients and the community helps ensure we can stretch every dollar that supports our 13-bedroom house in Savannah to better serve the families who depend on us. We are so grateful she has stepped up year after year to help them.”

All gifts should be unwrapped, and all donated items should be new, unopened and unused. Items can be dropped off through Monday, Dec. 19, during office hours at the Low Country Dermatology office at 310 Eisenhower Drive, Suite 12A.

The practice is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Fridays from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.

The mission of the Ronald McDonald House Charities is to create, find and support programs that enhance the health and well-being of children and families. The house operates on a waiting list most of the year. For more information, visit http://www.rmhccoastalempire.org/about-our-house.html

ABOUT LOW COUNTRY DERMATOLOGY
Low Country Dermatology specializes in the treatment of adult and pediatric diseases of the skin, hair and nails. Dr. Corinne Howington is a board certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology.

Low Country Dermatology is located at 310 Eisenhower Dr. Suite 12A Savannah, GA 31406. For more information, visit lcderm.com.

Media Contact:
Cecilia Russo
Cecilia Russo Marketing
info@crussomarketing.com
912-665-0005

Low Country Dermatology Announces Savannah Native, Elizabeth Brennan, Joins Staff as Physician Assistant

(SAVANNAH, GA) Low Country Dermatology is pleased to announce that Elizabeth Brennan has joined the Savannah practice as a Certified Physician Assistant. Brennan will assist in all areas of patient care, including the evaluation of skin lesions, offering routine skin exams and treating skin issues such as acne, warts, rashes and eczema.

“Lizzie is a wonderful addition to our staff,” said Dr. Corinne Howington. “She is geniunely concerned about about our patients and has a wonderful, upbeat personality that complements our in-office care.”

Brennan is a Savannah native. She graduated in 1997 from Savannah Country Day School. Brennan then received her undergraduate degree from The University of Georgia and her Masters from George Washington University.

“I appreciate Dr. Howington’s team approach to patient care and value her support and guidance. She has created an excellent, comfortable atmosphere for her patients and staff,” said Brennan.

Brennan is married with two children. In her free time, she enjoys exercising, spending time with her family and boating, but of course wearing sunscreen.

Elizabeth Brennan, Physician Assistant Low Country Dermatology

Elizabeth Brennan, Physician Assistant Low Country Dermatology

ABOUT LOW COUNTRY DERMATOLOGY
Low Country Dermatology specializes in the treatment of adult and pediatric diseases of the skin, hair and nails. Dr. Corinne Howington is a board certified dermatologist, with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. Low Country Dermatology is located at 310 Eisenhower Dr. Suite 12A Savannah, GA 31406. For more information, call 912-354-1018 or visit lcderm.com. To connect on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/LowCountryDermatology
Media Contact
Cecilia Russo
Cecilia Russo Marketing, LLC
912.665.0005
crusso72@gmail.com