Category: women

Award-Winning PR Executive to Lead Word-of-Mouth Strategy Workshop at THRIVE Lowcountry Women’s Conference

Award-Winning PR Executive to Lead Word-of-Mouth Strategy Workshop at THRIVE Lowcountry Women’s Conference

(HILTON HEAD, SC/SAVANNAH, GA) Marjorie Young, an award-winning public relations consultant and founder of Carriage Trade Public Relations® Inc., will share five proven strategies for businesses to increase visibility and create positive buzz in the community during the third Annual THRIVE Lowcountry Women’s Conference to be held in September on Hilton Head Island, S.C.

Marjorie Young, Carriage Trade Public Relations® Inc.,

Marjorie Young, Carriage Trade Public Relations® Inc.,

The premier women’s gathering will focus on enhancing and empowering personal and professional growth. Thought-provoking speakers will network with more than 200 local and visiting women, and special in-depth, skill-based learning workshops will be offered.

This year’s keynote speaker is South Carolina Lt. Gov. Pamela Evette. Prior to being elected the first Republican lieutenant governor, she was the CEO of Quality Business Solutions.

The conference will also offer special in-depth, skill-based learning workshops in hands-on settings with experts.

Young, who was last year’s keynote speaker, will lead this year’s participants in creating a yearly public relations plan using her signature Reputation Matrix™ method during an interactive 2.5-hour workshop.

“More than 90 percent of new business comes from word-of-mouth,” said Young. “This message is particularly important for small business owners and women entrepreneurs to ingest. The best way to grow your business is to network with other like-minded business owners and organizations that can complement your corporate goals and strategic direction.”

The Savannah Area Chamber of Commerce acclaimed Young as its Small Business Advocate of the Year in 2017. She was also named the organization’s Entrepreneur of the Year in 2006 and her Savannah-based firm that specializes in reputation management was recognized by the Savannah Morning News as Small Business of the Year in 2013. She will celebrate the 25th anniversary of Carriage Trade Public Relations in 2020.

Young earned a degree in Journalism from the University of Maryland and is also certified in crisis communication.

THRIVE will kick off on Sept. 26 at the Hilton Head Marriott Resort & Spa on Hilton Head Island with VIP workshops from 12:30 to 3 p.m. and the THRIVE Women’s Business Pitch Competition from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. A welcome reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m.

The conference will continue on Sept. 27 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. with breakout sessions featuring a variety of relevant topics such as workforce development, social media, women’s health, and business panels with local, successful business owners. The event will again be emceed by WSAV TV news anchor, Tina Tyus-Shaw.

To register or learn more, please visit https://www.hiltonheadchamber.org/thrive-2019/

ABOUT CARRIAGE TRADE PUBLIC RELATIONS®, INC. Carriage Trade Public Relations®, Inc. is Savannah’s premiere reputation management company. Founded in 1995 by Marjorie Young to help businesses increase their positive word of mouth in the community and globally online through its trademarked strategy, the REPUTATION MATRIX™ method.

MEDIA CONTACT
Elizabeth Poole
Director of Communications
Carriage Trade Public Relations®
Cecilia Russo Marketing
www.carriagetradepr.com
www.crussomarketing.com

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The Rotary Club of Savannah Announces Ellen B. Bolch as President and Names 2019 Board

The Rotary Club of Savannah Announces Ellen B. Bolch as President and Names 2019 Board

(SAVANNAH, GA) Ellen B. Bolch, President and CEO of THA Group, a family of in-home health companies serving coastal Georgia and South Carolina, has been elected president of the Rotary Club of Savannah.

Ellen Bolch, President of Rotary

Ellen Bolch, President of the Rotary Club of Savannah

Bolch will be joined on the Rotary Board of Directors by Secretary/Treasurer Harvey J. Gilbert, Sergeant-At-Arms Dale C. Critz, Jr., along with Louisa Abbot, Eddie Culver, Mark Dana, Emily Dickinson, Craig Harney, Sam McCachern, Jamie McCurry, Terri O’Neil, Cecilia Russo Turner, Philip Solomons, Jr., and Trip Tollison.

In addition to this new position, Bolch currently serves on the Boards of: The Union Society of Bethesda, The Georgia Historical Society, The Chatham Club, and the Board of Visitors of the Savannah Country Day School. She is heavily involved in her industry and community, having previously served on numerous national, regional and local Boards, including the National Association for Home Care and Hospice (NAHC) and as Co-Chair of the National Medicaid Action Council affiliated with NAHC. She is also a member the Advisory Board of the Home Care Technology Association of America. Bolch is the immediate past Chair of the South Carolina Home and Hospice Care Association and has been published in Caring Magazine, The Remington Report, the Journal of the American Association of Preferred Provider Organizations, the Home Care Journal of Texas and, in The Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology.

Bolch, a native of Savannah, received her BS in Nursing from the Medical College of Georgia and her Masters’ in Nursing and in Healthcare Administration from Penn State University. She received an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Savannah College of Art and Design in 2018. Ellen has been a health care educator at Penn State and Armstrong State Universities, and the Medical College of Georgia. Married to Dr. Sidney J. Bolch, III (Jeff) for 27 years, the pair have three sons and two daughters between them who have given them 10 grandchildren.

Bolch said of her newest role in Rotary, “As the new President, I am honored to ‘Stand Up’ before our Clubs auspicious group of professionals and business community leaders. Rotary connects people and we are united through these connections as we ‘Stand Up’ in our community and for our community and for those globally who cannot Stand Up for themselves.”

The Rotary Club of Savannah includes 205 community leaders and volunteers. Over the past 104 years, the club has championed local and regional developments that include completing the road to Tybee Island, improving the Savannah River for commercial traffic, enhancing the Dixie Highway system in southeast Georgia and building bridges over the Savannah and Altamaha Rivers. Most recently in recognition of its 100th anniversary, the club raised funds and built an all-accessible playground in Forsyth Park.

Meetings are held each Monday from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the DeSoto Hotel, 15 E. Liberty St. For more information, visit www.savrotary.org

CONTACT
Rotary Club of Savannah
P.O. Box 11105
Savannah, GA 31412
912.272.9711

Aging in Place: Ways to Update a House for Staying Long Term

Aging in Place: Ways to Update a House for Staying Long Term
By Sherry Daniel

No one likes to bring up the dreaded move that many of us fear will face us in the future. What am I referring to? Retirement homes.

No matter how improved and comfortable retirement homes may be, there’s nothing quite like living in a home in which you’ve made memories and crafted to suit your personality and needs.

With this in mind, many of our elderly neighbors are choosing to remain in their family homes rather than move to a retirement facility. To make that work smoothly, however, renovations are needed to adjust for an aging individual’s changing needs.

As the CEO and owner of Roto-Rooter Plumbers of Savannah, I notice different trends when we see an influx of specific requests. Lately, we’ve had more and more of our older customers ask for services such as height adjustments, mobility assistance installations and easier methods of accessibility in bathrooms and kitchens.

If you’re considering selling your home and moving to a retirement community, you might want to think about repairs or renovations that could make your home accessible. Below are 10 home plumbing renovations that will improve the accessibility of different parts of your house and allow you to postpone or avoid moving to a retirement home altogether.

1. Install pressure-balanced valves to provide water at steady temperatures regardless of pressure fluctuations in your kitchen and bathrooms.

2. Install grips around the shower, the toilet and your bed. Strategically located grab bars can prevent life-threatening falls. Slip-prevention flooring can help you feel secure as well.

3. Install hand-held, adjustable height, shower heads with a six-foot hose to direct the water where it’s needed.

4. Add a fold-down seat or bench in the shower. Some come with padded backs for extra comfort. Others will have a structure that extends outside the tub for easy entrance and exit.

5. Keep your spaces wide. Keep entryways, hallways and bathroom spaces clear of obstacles and wide enough for a wheelchair or other assistance device.

6. Install a toilet with the necessary height. Having the toilet at the proper height can make an incredible difference in the comfort and safety of your bathroom. A toilet paper holder designed for one-handed changing might be an added bonus.

7. Depending on your needs, a toilet/bidet combination can significantly improve hygiene.

8. Walk-in tubs and roll-in showers are imperative for those with mobility inhibitors. A roll-in shower is a shower stall that has a curb-less entrance and the door (or opening) is a minimum of 36 inches wide.

9. Consider a wheelchair accessible sink that is hung on the wall to leave space for your knees (or wheelchair) beneath a pipe-covering panel to protect your legs. You can also install lever handle faucets or faucets that are pedal controlled.

10. Install adjustable height (or varying height) counter tops with provisions for roll-under access in front of the sink and main counter top.

Taking advantage of these 10 tips can make your bathrooms wheelchair or simply “aging” accessible. Making these renovations can extend the amount of time you can live safely in your family home.

Sherry Daniel is the owner and CEO of Roto-Rooter Plumbers of Savannah. Roto-Rooter Plumbers of Savannah is headquartered at 2016 E Broad St, Savannah, GA 31401. The main office line is 912-355-1287 and you may contact Sherry Daniel directly at 912-629-1646. The local website is http://www.rotosavannah.com/

Sherry Daniel, Roto Rooter Plumbers of Savannah

Sherry Daniel, Roto Rooter Plumbers of Savannah

 

 

What it Takes to be a Successful Woman in the Field of Architecture

What it Takes to be a Successful Woman in the Field of Architecture
By Gretchen Callejas

Frank Lloyd Wright. I.M. Pei. Those are the familiar names of two of America’s best-known architects.

Wright’s distinct prairie-style homes dot the American landscape while Pei’s large but elegantly designed urban buildings and complexes are among the world’s most famous architectural works. Pei’s projects, among others, include the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the controversial glass pyramid in Paris’ Louvre Museum courtyard.

But have you heard of Julia Morgan, who designed California’s famous Hearst Castle? Or trailblazers such as Marion Mahony Griffin, the first woman to be officially licensed as an architect, and Zaha Hadid, the first woman to win the Pritzker Architecture Prize?

It isn’t surprising if you haven’t. According to a January 2019 article in ThoughtCo., which listed 20 famous female architects, the role that women have played in architecture and design often go under the radar.

While architecture has been a male-dominated field, that is not the case at Felder & Associates, where I have worked since its inception in 2012. We have four women and three men on staff. The forward-thinking leadership of the firm’s managing principal, Brian Felder, has played an extraordinary part in making our workplace a gender free oasis in an otherwise industry-wide testosterone-filled desert.

Why is architecture, like so many other professions, such a tough profession for women to crack?

According to a 2016 article in the Los Angeles Times, only 18 percent of licensed practitioners are women although they make up nearly half of U.S. architecture school graduates. This disparity sometimes is referred to as “the missing 32 percent.” Unfortunately, females leave the field in disturbingly high numbers after they’re confronted with lower salaries, given fewer career-building opportunities or find a lack of mentors, who champion for them.

Full-time female architects earn 20 percent less than their male counterparts, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Plus, architecture’s history as a male-dominated profession has contributed to an all-consuming workplace culture that leaves little flexibility for women expected to balance work and family. According to the Times article, 75 percent of female survey respondents had experienced sexual discrimination on the job, and 83 percent believed having a child would hurt their careers.

My personal observations and experiences have confirmed some of these disparities, but I consider myself lucky.

Fortunately, I’ve been able to maintain a successful professional career while balancing family because I have a husband who shares responsibilities and encouragement. Without his support, it would be more challenging to continue with a professional career.

And while I have quite a few female friends who are architects, I have never worked for a woman nor had a strong female mentor. Contractors and clients often assume I need to ask my male boss for help in understanding construction, codes or a design issue. When I approach a problem with the same assertiveness as a male architect, I’m sometimes labeled with the “B”-word.

Since I was a kid, I dreamed of designing buildings before I knew what that encompassed. And now as an adult would I encourage young girls to enter architecture? Absolutely. I would tell young women (and men) entering the field that determination and passion go a long way. You will be successful if you work hard, tune out the negativity and chase your goals with perseverance. If you want to be an Architect, then go be one.

I finally believe that I am in a position to give them a hand. I’ve been around enough to help guide them and try to be the mentor I never had. I’m pleased we have two young women working with us at Felder & Associates. Alma Johnson and Cathryn Sinclair graduated with architectural degrees from the Savannah College of Art and Design last year and are interning with us as project associates.

Sinclair says she believes the playing field is more level than ever before but there is always room for improvement.

“I hope to continue to see the gap close,” she says.

For Johnson, success is based on how hard you work.

“Now, the gender gap does exist, but I think that the world is evolving on a more modern idea of a woman in the workplace. I don’t see gender. I see what skill sets I need to acquire to be as successful as the candidate next to me,” Johnson says.

I hope their perspectives will remain true and their positivity high after spending 15 years or so in the industry. I suspect they will reflect on their early days as a time when they had to deal with an old and outdated set of standards.

One thing I know for certain. They are in a wonderful setting to avoid bias and discrimination working at Felder & Associates. We are, thankfully, treated equally regardless of our gender, and we treat one another with mutual respect and understanding.

My hope for young women in architecture is that they will continue to mentor the next generations of women architects, have equal opportunities and respect. One day we will be as well-known as Frank Lloyd Wright and I.M. Pei.

Gretchen Callejas is a project architect at Felder & Associates, where she specializes in historic preservation, adaptive reuse, small scale commercial architecture and high-end residential design. She is also LEED-accredited from the U.S. Green Building Council. Callejas earned Bachelor of Architecture and Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design from Ball State University and a Master of Fine Arts in Historic Preservation from Savannah College of Art and Design.

 

Gretchen Callejas
Felder & Associates

Contact:
Gretchen Callejas
Email: gretchen@felderassociates.net
Phone: 912-777-3979
Website: www.felderassociates.net

Citations:

1. Craven, Jackie (2019, January). 20 Famous Women Architects. ThoughtCo. Retrieved from: https://www.thoughtco.com/famous-female-architects-177890

2. Stratigakos, Despina (2016, April). Why is the world of architecture so male-dominated? LA Times. Retrieved from: https://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-stratigakos-missing-women-architects-20160421-story.html

3. Newman, Caroline (2019, January). Three Generations Of Female Architects Seek To Bring More Women Into The Profession. UVA Today. Retrieved from: https://news.virginia.edu/content/3-generations-female-architects-seek-bring-more-women-profession

Horizons Savannah Announces Participation in Horizons Giving Day on May 15

Horizons Savannah Announces Participation in Horizons Giving Day on May 15
Local campaign seeks to raise $75,000 to expand the transformational education program

(SAVANNAH, GA) Horizons Savannahannounced today its participation in Horizons Giving Day, a national effort on May 15 with a single goal: to raise money to expand existing Horizonsprograms and bring Horizons to more students and their families. Horizons Savannahwill engage in a competitive, yet friendly, race to raise funds online and in-person with more than 50 Horizonsprograms nationwide. All funds raised in support of Horizons Savannahwill stay in the local community.

Horizonsis a transformational, community-centered education program working to close the opportunity gap for low-income children in Kindergarten through 12th grade. Horizonsincludes six weeks of academics, arts, swim lessons, field trips, and more each summer through partnerships with Savannah Country Day School, Bethesda Academy, St. Andrew’s School, and Savannah Christian Preparatory School. Horizonsstudents gain 8 – 12 weeks’ of reading and math skills each summer. Additionally, 97 percent of Horizonshigh school students graduate on time, and 91 percent go on to attend college or other post-secondary education.

Horizonsmakes a long-term commitment to each student, providing critical summer programming and school year supports,” says Christy Edwards, Executive Director of Horizons Savannah. “Our high quality project-based learning is led by an incredible faculty, and our swim lessons and positive learning environments impact students’ self-confidence and provide the skills needed to reach their goals.”

Ninety percent of Horizonsstudents return to the program each year.

At Horizons Savannah, nearly 300 K-12 students from the local public school system participate in project-based learning curriculum, STEAM, literacy, and swimming each year. This number is expected to exceed 400 students by 2024.

Demand for Horizonsis strong, and the success of Horizons Giving Daydepends on the support of our community.

To contribute to Horizons Savannah, visit www.HorizonsGivingDay.org/organizations/horizons-savannah.

ABOUT HORIZONS SAVANNAH
Recognized as one of America’s best summer learning programs, Horizons Savannahat Savannah Country Day School, Bethesda Academy, and St. Andrew’s School, and Savannah Christian Preparatory Schoolserves over 300 low-income students each summer. Horizonsis a transformative experience for young people in Kindergarten through the 12th grade focused on helping low-income students close the achievement gap through academic support and confidence building. For more information, please contact Horizons SavannahExecutive Director Christy Edwards at 912-961-8854 or cedwards@savcds.org. You can also visit our website at http://horizonssavannah.org/, check out our Facebook page.

ABOUT HORIZONS NATIONAL
Horizons Nationalis a growing, community-centered network of more than 50 affiliate sites nationwide that provides high-quality academic enrichment programs to children in need, from Pre-K through high school. Located on the campuses of independent schools, charter schools, colleges, and universities, Horizonsprograms offer a project-based curriculum, focused on reading, STEM, the arts, fitness, nutrition, and field trips.

Beaufort Dermatology Innovates With Non-Invasive Skin Exam Technology

Beaufort Dermatology Innovates With Non-Invasive Skin Exam Technology

(BEAUFORT, SOUTH CAROLINA) Beaufort Dermatologyof Pinnacle Medical Groupis thrilled to present Vivascope 1500, the newest in skin cancer technology allowing the provider to make a diagnosis without removing any tissue. Pinnacleis the only practice in the area offering this advanced technology.

In-vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive skin imaging modality for detecting diseases of the skin such as melanoma and other cancers. It can be used in place of biopsies in certain cases and is effective in viewing large skin lesions where a biopsy of the entire spot might be difficult.

Dr. Klenke - Confocal Machine - Beaufort Dermatology

Dr. Audrey Klenke of Beaufort Dermatology using the Vivascope 1500.

Dr. Audrey Klenke of Beaufort Dermatology using the Vivascope 1500

Dr. Audrey Klenke of Beaufort Dermatology using the Vivascope 1500.

Additionally, it is useful in defining the margins of an area for surgical excision and can be useful in evaluating the results of treatment. Among its advantages is the ability to avoid potential scarring from biopsies and also provides a safe, painless option for children or those who may be nervous about procedures.

“Medical research and development shape a modern medical practice,” said owner Dr. Audrey A. Klenke, MD, FACS. “We are so excited to be the first to offer Vivascope 1500, which can decipher a lesion that needs to be removed versus one that can be safely monitored. In the Lowcountry, our fun-in-the-sun lifestyle makes it critical to prioritize skin health.”

Dr. Klenke adds, “The fact that procedures are becoming increasingly less invasive without losing the ability to accurately diagnose and treat is great news for patient care.”

ABOUT THE PINNACLE MEDICAL GROUP
The Pinnacle Medical Groupis the locally owned and operated parent company of Pinnacle Plastic Surgery, PURE Medical Spaand Beaufort Dermatology. Principal, Dr. Audrey Klenke is the only board-certified female plastic surgeon in Beaufort County, South Carolina, and is affiliated with multiple outpatient centers in the area as well as Beaufort Memorial Hospitaland Hilton Head Hospital. Pinnacle Plastic Surgeryand PURE Medical Spaare located at 7 Mallet Way, Bluffton, SC 29910. Beaufort Dermatologyis located at 1096 Ribaut Road, Beaufort, SC 29902. For more information, please call (843) 815-6699, or visit http://pinnaclemd.com/and http://www.beaufortdermatology.com/.

MEDIA CONTACT
Melody Jones
Sales & Marketing Specialist
Pinnacle Medical Group
7 Mallett Way, Bluffton, SC 29910
p: 843.815.6699 ext. 1009
f: 843.815.6695
mjones@pinnaclemd.com
www.PinnacleMD.com