Category: summer

Local Youths Receive Sailing Camp Scholarships from Audi Hilton Head

Local Youths Receive Sailing Camp Scholarships from Audi Hilton Head

(HILTON HEAD ISLAND, SC) Audi Hilton Headand the Hilton Head Boys & Girls Club’s Fund-a-Need program are providing scholarships for area children to attend sailing camp this week at the South Carolina Yacht Club at Windmill Harbour Marina.

Kids were chosen for the sailing scholarships based on their responsibility, a desire to learn how to sail and a high level of comfort on the water. Among the recipients were six members of the Boys & Girls Club.

Local Youths Receive Sailing Camp Scholarships from Audi Hilton HeadLocal Youths Receive Sailing Camp Scholarships from Audi Hilton Head

Local Youths Receive Sailing Camp Scholarships from Audi Hilton Head

Local Youths Receive Sailing Camp Scholarships from Audi Hilton HeadLocal Youths Receive Sailing Camp Scholarships from Audi Hilton HeadLocal Youths Receive Sailing Camp Scholarships from Audi Hilton HeadLocal Youths Receive Sailing Camp Scholarships from Audi Hilton HeadLocal Youths Receive Sailing Camp Scholarships from Audi Hilton HeadLocal Youths Receive Sailing Camp Scholarships from Audi Hilton HeadLocal Youths Receive Sailing Camp Scholarships from Audi Hilton Head

Audi Hilton Headprovided two scholarships. The rest were sponsored by Fund-a-Need as part of the club’s annual gala, of which Audi Hilton Headis the presenting sponsor.

“We’re so happy that these kids are getting to experience being on the beautiful waterways of Hilton Head, through our support,” said Warner Peacock, President & CEO of Peacock Automotive, the parent company of Audi Hilton Head. “The South Carolina Yacht Club is a great place for theBoys & Girls Clubmembers to have an introduction to the sport.”

The sailing camp will continue through Friday, July 20, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.

ABOUT PEACOCK AUTOMOTIVE
Peacock Automotiveowns and operates 24 automotive dealerships representing 31 brands in Georgia, South Carolina and Florida, employing more than 700 individuals. The company’s headquarters are located at Peacock Auto Mallon U.S. 278, five miles east of I-95 at Exit 8 near Bluffton, S.C. The dealerships at the Auto Mallinclude Peacock Alfa Romeo, Peacock Maserati,Peacock Chrysler Jeep Dodge Ram Fiat, Jaguar Hilton Head, Land Rover Hilton Head, Peacock Subaru, Porsche of Hilton Head, Audi Hilton Head, Peacock Hyundai Hilton Head, Peacock Genesis of Hilton Head, Hilton Head Volkswagenand Peacock Used Cars & Trucks. Additionally, the company owns Peacock Hyundai Brunswick, Peacock Genesis of Brunswickand Peacock Chrysler Jeep Dodge Ram Brunswickin Brunswick, Ga., and Peacock Hyundai Savannah, Peacock Genesis of Savannahand Savannah Volkswagenin Savannah, Ga. Other holdings include Jaguar Columbia, Land Rover Columbia, Peacock Hyundai Columbiaand Hyundai Genesis of Columbia. Its subsidiary, Peacock-Griffey Automotive, owns Peacock Fordin the Orlando area of Florida. Peacock Automotivealso owns and operates the Peacock Collision Center and the Wellness Institutein Bluffton, S.C., andPeacock Insurancein Savannah. Peacock Automotivewas awarded Business of the Year in 2017 from the Greater Bluffton, South Carolina, Chamber of Commerce. For more information about Peacock Automotive, call (843) 208-1258or visit https://www.peacockautomotive.com/

CONTACT
Jill Jauch
Peacock Automotive
265 Drivers Way
Hardeeville, SC 29927
Office: (843)-208-1217
jj@peacockautomotive.com

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LDSS Announces Camp Buddy 2018 in Chatham, Effingham

LDSS Announces Camp Buddy 2018 in Chatham, Effingham

(CHATHAM AND EFFINGHAM COUNTIES) The Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society (LDSS) will host its tenth annual Camp Buddy summer camps in Chatham and Effingham Counties later this month and in July.

Camp Buddy offers programs to prepare children for the upcoming school year with the goal of promoting information retention from the previous year. Special education teachers along with occupational, physical and speech therapists have worked to design a customized curriculum that meets this goal most effectively.

“Camp Buddy has helped many children to excel in new areas and become stronger students as they approach the upcoming year,” said Pam Hussey, Chatham Camp Buddy director. “We look forward to continuing and even bolstering that legacy with our tenth year.”

This year’s Chatham Camp Buddy, July 9 – 20, will have a Dr. Seuss theme designed to bring a whimsical twist to camp activities such as music, dance, arts and crafts as well as bike, trike and scooter-board riding.

Chatham County campers in high school will cook lunch for their parents, embark on a river trip with Bull River Cruises and have visits from special guests who will include a soccer coach, a karate teacher and a yoga instructor. They also will participate in community service projects such as food donations and will visit Harvesters, a community food network, to learn about volunteer opportunities.

Effingham Camp Buddy, June 18-22, will feature special guests such as Chef Nick Mueller, who will do a cooking segment, local artists such as Morgan Webb, who will do art projects, and karate master instructor Carson Fortner, who will do a training session with the kids. Other activities will include a special field trip, crafts, music, dancing, pet therapy and operating the camp store.

Information on CHATHAM Camp Buddy:
Dates: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from Monday, July 9 through Friday, July 20.
Times: Middle and high school camps will be 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., and elementary school camp will be 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Preschoolers will attend from 9 a.m.-12 p.m.
Location: Coastal Middle School in Savannah, Ga.

For more information about Chatham Camp Buddy, contact Pam Hussey at (912) 220-6429 or pbjhussey@gmail.com.

Information on EFFINGHAM Camp Buddy:
Dates: Every day from Monday, June 18 through Friday, June 22.
Times: Camp for ages 3-9 will be 8:30-11:30 a.m., and camp for ages 10 and up will be 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Location: Blandford Elementary School in Rincon, Ga.

To learn more about Effingham Camp Buddy, contact Molly Marchese at (912) 213-9127 or mollymarchese@windstream.net

Camp Buddy is sponsored by the Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society and is made possible through the generosity of the community, friends and families of LDSS and events such as the Buddy Walk and Night of Champions. For more information about LDSS, visit http://www.ldssga.org/

Chatham Camp Buddy Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society 2017

Campers enjoy Chatham Camp Buddy 2017

ABOUT THE LOWCOUNTRY DOWN SYNDROME SOCIETY
The Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society (LDSS) is a family support group to benefit people with Down syndrome and their families through local leadership, outreach, education and advocacy to champion and celebrate acceptance and inclusion. Meetings are held every fourth Tuesday of the month, typically with a guest speaker and social time for families to meet and interact with one another. LDSS encourages people to bring their children. LDSS is an affiliate of the National Down Syndrome Society. For more information about LDSS, visit http://www.ldssga.org/

CONTACT
Tom Kenkel
Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society
912-373-6377
tkenkel@ldssga.org

MEDIA CONTACT
Marjorie Young
Carriage Trade Public Relations
912-844-9990
marjorie@carriagetradepr.com
www.carriagetradepr.com

Low Country Dermatology’s Walk For Melanoma Awareness Announced for May 19th

Melanoma Awareness Walk with Low Country Dermatology to be Held at Skidaway Island State Park on May 19th
Three-Mile Hike to Benefit Nancy N. and J.C Lewis Cancer & Research Pavilion

(SAVANNAH, GA) In recognition of Melanoma Awareness Month, Dr. Corinne Howington and Elizabeth Brennan of Low Country Dermatology will lead a melanoma awareness walk on Saturday, May 19th at 3 p.m. at Skidaway Island State Park.

Howington and her staff will lead a three-mile walk along the park’s scenic trails, sharing facts and prevention techniques for melanoma and taking questions. Water, sunscreen and some light refreshments will be provided.

Low Country Dermatology's Walk for Melanoma Awareness Participants in 2017

Low Country Dermatology’s Walk for Melanoma Awareness Participants in 2017

National Melanoma Skin Cancer Awareness Month, designated by the American Academy of Dermatology, is celebrated in May to raise awareness of the risk of skin cancer and increase the chances of early detection.

“For those of us who live along the southern coastline, staying out of the sun is often not practical or desirable,” Howington said. “It’s important for everyone to learn some simple but essential ways to protect their skin from the sun’s dangerous UV rays before they and their family head off to enjoy the great outdoors.”

Low Country Dermatology's Walk for Melanoma Awareness

Low Country Dermatology’s Walk for Melanoma Awareness

Howington is a board-certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. She and her staff will give participants SPF30 sunscreen, which has been shown to prevent the onset of skin cancer by a whopping 80 percent.

They also will share “did you know” facts during the hike, such as:

• Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer and is the leading cause of death from skin disease.

• The American Association of Dermatology estimates the rates of melanoma in the United States for 2018 are:
– Approximately 178,560 new melanomas.
– About 91,270 of those cases will be invasive.

• Rates for melanoma have been rising for the last 30 years, and melanoma accounts for nearly half of all cancers, according to the American Cancer Society.

Indications of potential skin cancer include moles or growths that are asymmetrical, have an irregular border, exhibit changes in color, have a diameter larger than the size of a pencil eraser or have evolved in size or thickness. Self-examine your skin; when caught early, melanoma is highly curable.

Registration for the event is $35, which includes the parking fee for the park. Proceeds will benefit the Nancy N. and J.C Lewis Cancer & Research Pavilion in Savannah. Participants are asked to meet the group at Picnic Area-A after entering the park.

Tickets and more information for Low Country Dermatology’s Melanoma Awareness Walk can be found at https://cityspin.com/savannah/e/melanoma-awareness-walk/

ABOUT LOW COUNTRY DERMATOLOGY
Low Country Dermatology specializes in the treatment of adult and pediatric diseases of the skin, hair and nails. Dr. Corinne Howington is a board-certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. Low Country Dermatology is located at 310 Eisenhower Dr. Suite 12A Savannah, GA 31406. For more information, visit lcderm.com.

Media Contact:
Cecilia Russo
Cecilia Russo Marketing
info@crussomarketing.com
912-665-0005

Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology

The Dark Side of Tanning

The Dark Side of Tanning
by Dr. Corinne Howington

There’s nothing healthy about a tan. Simply put, a tan equals your skin cells in trauma trying to protect themselves from cancer. Just one sun-damaged cell can initiate the onset of melanoma, which can get into the bloodstream and spread. Even if melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, is cut out, cancer may reappear months or years later, often in the lung, liver or brain.

Melanoma is a cancer of the melanocyte cells in the epidermis of the skin. These are the cells that make the melanin that results in skin color. It is also the most serious and dangerous type of skin cancer because it can spread easily to other organs in the body. But since the sun’s UV rays cause 95 percent of all melanomas, the good news is that melanoma is largely preventable by avoiding over exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

While this is an important message for adults to heed for themselves, it is even more critical for their children. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, just a few serious sunburns or trips to the tanning bed can increase a young person’s risk of skin cancer later in life. Parents should know, too, that it can take as little as 15 minutes for unprotected skin to be damaged by the sun’s UV rays and that it can take up to 12 hours for skin to show the full effect of sun exposure.

Here are five easy ways to avoid the dark side of tanning:

1. Seek shade. The strength of UV radiation is highest in the four-hour period around noon. That would be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or, during daylight savings time, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The best thing you can do for your skin is to plan your day to get out of the sun or seek shade when the sun is high in the sky.

2. Protective clothing. Wear clothing that covers as much skin as possible, especially your shoulders, arms and legs. Choose loose fitting, closely woven fabrics that cast a dense shadow when held up to the light.

3. Broad-brimmed hat. A hat with a wide brim is a great way to protect the top of your head and also your neck, ears and face. These are parts of the body where skin cancer often occurs.

4. Sunglasses. The most effective way to protect your eyes is to wear sunglasses that are labeled “UV400” or “100% UV Protection” and wrap around the sides of the face. Darker lenses do not provide better eye protection. In fact, lens color does not matter at all.

5. Sunscreen. Used properly, sunscreens are effective in preventing sunburn. This means generously applying SPF30 broad spectrum sunscreen to your skin 20 minutes before you head outdoors and re-applying every two hours. Studies have shown that SPF30 sunscreen decreases your chances of developing melanoma by 80 percent.

Sunscreen should never be used to extend the amount of time you spend in the sun and should not be used to help get a tan. You should also be aware that some drugs and medical conditions can make you more vulnerable to UV damage. These include Retin-A skin cream, antibiotics and cataracts.

Too much UV exposure may also result in structural damage to the skin – burning or scarring in the short term and premature aging or skin cancer in the long-term.

People with fair skin and light-colored eyes are usually more vulnerable to the sun’s harmful rays, but melanomas can occur in anyone. A July 2016 study in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology showed it is more deadly in people with darker skin. African American patients were most likely to be diagnosed with melanoma in its later stages than any other group in the study, and they also had the worst prognosis and the lowest overall survival rate.

Melanoma can develop anywhere on the body, including places that do not receive frequent sun exposure, and is likely to have a similar appearance to a mole. Unlike a mole, however, a melanoma will usually grow larger and become more irregular in shape and color. If you’re concerned about a mole or lesion on your body, talk to your doctor and learn the ABCDE rule, which is a useful guide for detecting potentially dangerous moles on your skin. Look for moles that are asymmetrical (not the same on both sides), have irregular borders, have changed color, are 0.5 centimeters or larger in diameter or have changed in size, shape, color or height. If you are worried about a mole or see any of the signs described above, see your doctor right away.

Dr. Corinne Howington, of Low Country Dermatology, is a board certified dermatologist, with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology.

 

Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology

Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology