Category: Dermatology

Low Country Dermatology Presents The Anderson Cancer Institute With Donation From “Melanoma, Take a Hike!” Skin Cancer Awareness Excursion

(SAVANNAH, GA) Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology presented $500 to the Curtis and Elizabeth Anderson Cancer Institute at Memorial University Medical Center. This donation was made possible by proceeds raised during the inaugural skin cancer awareness excursion, “Melanoma, Take a Hike!

Low Country Dermatology Dr. Corinne Howington Donates 500 to the Anderson Cancer Institute and Memorial Health Foundation 2017

Karen Terry, Director of Operations at the Anderson Cancer Institute; Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology; and Robyn Rotunda, Development Director at the Memorial Health Foundation.

The event took place through the scenic trails of Skidaway Island State Park during the high afternoon sun in recognition of Skin Cancer Awareness Month which is designated by the American Academy of Dermatology to raise awareness about the risk of skin cancer and increase the chances of early detection. Along the way, Dr. Howington and her staff shared prevention techniques for melanoma and answered questions from participants.

“With events like Melanoma, Take a Hike!, we hope not only to prevent skin cancer by teaching people how to protect themselves from harmful UV rays,” said Dr. Howington, “but also to support those organizations, like the Anderson Cancer Institute, who are fighting cancer’s devastating effects every day.”

The Anderson Cancer Institute provides cancer screening, diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, support services and long-term follow-up for cancer patients. Their disease management teams specialize in breast, colorectal, urology, melanoma, thoracic, head and neck, upper gastrointestinal, and gynecologic cancers.

Dr. Howington is a board-certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. She and her staff also distributed SPF 30 sunscreen, which has been shown to prevent the onset of some types of skin cancer by 80 percent.

For more information on Low Country Dermatology, visit lcderm.com. For more information on the Anderson Cancer Institute, visit aci.memorialhealth.com.

ABOUT LOW COUNTRY DERMATOLOGY
Low Country Dermatology specializes in the treatment of adult and pediatric diseases of the skin, hair and nails. Dr. Corinne Howington is a board certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. Low Country Dermatology is located at 310 Eisenhower Dr. Suite 12A Savannah, GA 31406. For more information, visit lcderm.com.

Media Contact:
Cecilia Russo
Cecilia Russo Marketing
info@crussomarketing.com
912-665-0005

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Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology

The Dark Side of Tanning

The Dark Side of Tanning
by Dr. Corinne Howington

There’s nothing healthy about a tan. Simply put, a tan equals your skin cells in trauma trying to protect themselves from cancer. Just one sun-damaged cell can initiate the onset of melanoma, which can get into the bloodstream and spread. Even if melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, is cut out, cancer may reappear months or years later, often in the lung, liver or brain.

Melanoma is a cancer of the melanocyte cells in the epidermis of the skin. These are the cells that make the melanin that results in skin color. It is also the most serious and dangerous type of skin cancer because it can spread easily to other organs in the body. But since the sun’s UV rays cause 95 percent of all melanomas, the good news is that melanoma is largely preventable by avoiding over exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

While this is an important message for adults to heed for themselves, it is even more critical for their children. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, just a few serious sunburns or trips to the tanning bed can increase a young person’s risk of skin cancer later in life. Parents should know, too, that it can take as little as 15 minutes for unprotected skin to be damaged by the sun’s UV rays and that it can take up to 12 hours for skin to show the full effect of sun exposure.

Here are five easy ways to avoid the dark side of tanning:

1. Seek shade. The strength of UV radiation is highest in the four-hour period around noon. That would be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or, during daylight savings time, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The best thing you can do for your skin is to plan your day to get out of the sun or seek shade when the sun is high in the sky.

2. Protective clothing. Wear clothing that covers as much skin as possible, especially your shoulders, arms and legs. Choose loose fitting, closely woven fabrics that cast a dense shadow when held up to the light.

3. Broad-brimmed hat. A hat with a wide brim is a great way to protect the top of your head and also your neck, ears and face. These are parts of the body where skin cancer often occurs.

4. Sunglasses. The most effective way to protect your eyes is to wear sunglasses that are labeled “UV400” or “100% UV Protection” and wrap around the sides of the face. Darker lenses do not provide better eye protection. In fact, lens color does not matter at all.

5. Sunscreen. Used properly, sunscreens are effective in preventing sunburn. This means generously applying SPF30 broad spectrum sunscreen to your skin 20 minutes before you head outdoors and re-applying every two hours. Studies have shown that SPF30 sunscreen decreases your chances of developing melanoma by 80 percent.

Sunscreen should never be used to extend the amount of time you spend in the sun and should not be used to help get a tan. You should also be aware that some drugs and medical conditions can make you more vulnerable to UV damage. These include Retin-A skin cream, antibiotics and cataracts.

Too much UV exposure may also result in structural damage to the skin – burning or scarring in the short term and premature aging or skin cancer in the long-term.

People with fair skin and light-colored eyes are usually more vulnerable to the sun’s harmful rays, but melanomas can occur in anyone. A July 2016 study in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology showed it is more deadly in people with darker skin. African American patients were most likely to be diagnosed with melanoma in its later stages than any other group in the study, and they also had the worst prognosis and the lowest overall survival rate.

Melanoma can develop anywhere on the body, including places that do not receive frequent sun exposure, and is likely to have a similar appearance to a mole. Unlike a mole, however, a melanoma will usually grow larger and become more irregular in shape and color. If you’re concerned about a mole or lesion on your body, talk to your doctor and learn the ABCDE rule, which is a useful guide for detecting potentially dangerous moles on your skin. Look for moles that are asymmetrical (not the same on both sides), have irregular borders, have changed color, are 0.5 centimeters or larger in diameter or have changed in size, shape, color or height. If you are worried about a mole or see any of the signs described above, see your doctor right away.

Dr. Corinne Howington, of Low Country Dermatology, is a board certified dermatologist, with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology.

 

Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology

Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology

Column: Please Meet Courtney Zechman

Please Meet Courtney Zechman

Courtney Zechman
Lead medical esthetician at Low Country Dermatology

Courtney Zechman, Licensed Esthetician, Low Country Dermatology

Courtney Zechman, Licensed Esthetician, Low Country Dermatology

How long have you been in the profession?
I graduated from the Aveda Institute of Covington, La., in 2011, and have been in the esthetics business for about six years.

What motivated you to get into this business?
I’ve always had a love for beauty, especially making women feel beautiful through makeup. When I started school, my goal was to become a makeup artist and eventually work in television and movies. I quickly discovered that I loved teaching women how to improve their skin through integrated skin care. Treatments I provide include facials, waxing, chemical peels, dermaplaning, Laser treatments and microneedling.

What are you most passionate about?
Educating not only my clients but my friends and family on proper sunscreen protection. A lot of women think the spf in their makeup and moisturizer is enough to stop the damaging effects of sun exposure, and a lot of men think they don’t need spf because they aren’t sun bathing.

What has surprised you most about working with Low Country Dermatology?
Realizing the difference in over-the-counter beauty products versus in-office cosmeceuticals. For the same price as some of the department store skin-care products, you can achieve noticeable results with products found in an esthetics or dermatology office.

What’s the best thing to happen since you started working with Low Country Dermatology?
I can’t explain how proud I get when my clients tell me they are getting compliments on their skin all the time after having treatments with me. My schedule continues to grow each month. Knowing that my clients are talking with their friends and peers about their experience with me continues to surprise and make me feel so proud of myself.

What do you think will change about dermatology over the next five years?
Cosmetic treatments will outweigh dermatology treatments in the future. Thanks to social media and technology as a whole, people are more aware and cautious of the sun and getting too much exposure. Instead of skin cancer treatment and prevention patients may be more inclined to treat aging and other cosmetic issues.

What are three things that might surprise someone about you?
1. I attended 13 different schools and have lived in nine different states.
2. I live an hour away in a small town called Ludowici, and my two older sisters live within walking distance of me.
3. I am a single mom of one handsome six-year-old boy named Oliver Bryan who is the 10th of 20 grandchildren.

What do you do when you aren’t at the office?
You can usually find me at one of my sisters’ houses. We are always together on the weekends for birthdays, ball games, parties or some other family gathering.

Where are you from?
I was born in Tacoma, Wash., and raised in northern Kentucky, but I call Georgia home.

Who has been your professional mentor?
When I was getting into the world of beauty professionally, a woman I was so inspired by was Kandee Johnson who was a professional makeup artist, single mom and YouTube blogger. She was so positive and uplifting during one of the hardest times in my life.
Dr. Howington is another of my professional mentors. If I feel lost or stumped with my clients, she is always there to guide me in the right direction.

Who is your hero?
My heroes are my sisters. They have helped me through some of the hardest times in my life, they consistently help with my son and they never ask anything in return.

What motivates you to work hard?
When I first started at Low Country Dermatology, I did not have a lot of confidence. I was used to working in spas making people fall asleep during relaxing facials, not treating acne and aging with chemicals. My clients are the ones who made me feel like I was doing something right every time they would reschedule month after month. I have learned to believe in myself and I am continuously pushing myself to learn more and achieve more in my career.

What is one thing you couldn’t live without?
My family. I don’t know what I would do without them.

Contact information:
Address: 310 Eisenhower Dr. Suite 12A Savannah, GA 31406
Phone: 912-354-1018
Website: lcderm.com

Melanoma, Take a Hike! Skin Cancer Awareness Excursion with Low Country Dermatology

Melanoma, Take a Hike! Skin Cancer Awareness Excursion with Low Country Dermatology Held at Skidaway Island State Park Benefiting Curtis & Elizabeth Anderson Cancer Institute

(SAVANNAH, GA) In recognition of Melanoma Awareness Month, Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology lead a skin cancer awareness excursion — “Melanoma, Take a Hike!” — at Skidaway Island State Park.

Howington and her staff led a short hike along the park’s scenic trails, sharing facts and prevention techniques for melanoma and taking questions. The hike was originally planned to span 3-miles, but was shortened due to inclement weather issues.

Melanoma Take a Hike Skin Cancer Expedition with Low Country Dermatology

Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology and her staff lead a three-mile hike for skin cancer awareness at Skidaway Island State Park, sharing facts and prevention techniques for melanoma. Pictured: Left to right front row: Sherri Spellman; Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology; Skylar Lanier; Sherry Williams; Cecilia Russo Turner; and Elizabeth Brennan; Low Country Dermatology Physician Assistant. Left to right back row: John Spellman; Elise Spellman; Kelli Hartley, Low Country Dermatology office manager; Roz Hager; Megan Haubein; Heather Haubein; Bobby Haubein and Josh Hodnett.

National Melanoma Skin Cancer Awareness Month, designated by the American Academy of Dermatology, is celebrated in May to raise awareness of the risk of skin cancer and increase the chances of early detection.

“For those of us who live along the southern coastline, staying out of the sun is often not practical or desirable,” Howington said. “It’s important for everyone to learn some simple but essential ways to protect their skin from the sun’s dangerous UV rays before they and their family head off to enjoy the great outdoors.”

Howington is a board-certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. She and her staff gave participants SPF30 sunscreen, which has been shown to prevent the onset of some types of skin cancer.

Proceeds from the event are benefiting the Curtis & Elizabeth Anderson Cancer Institute in Savannah. More information for Melanoma, Take a Hike! Skin Cancer Awareness Excursion with Low Country Dermatology can be found at http://lcderm.com/melanoma-take-hike/

ABOUT LOW COUNTRY DERMATOLOGY
Low Country Dermatology specializes in the treatment of adult and pediatric diseases of the skin, hair and nails. Dr. Corinne Howington is a board certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. Low Country Dermatology is located at 310 Eisenhower Dr. Suite 12A Savannah, GA 31406. For more information, visit lcderm.com.

Media Contact:
Cecilia Russo
Cecilia Russo Marketing
info@crussomarketing.com
912-665-0005

Melanoma, Take a Hike! Skin Cancer Awareness Excursion with Low Country Dermatology to be Held at Skidaway Island State Park on May 21

Melanoma, Take a Hike! Skin Cancer Awareness Excursion with Low Country Dermatology to be Held at Skidaway Island State Park on May 21
Three-Mile Hike to Benefit Curtis & Elizabeth Anderson Cancer Institute

In recognition of Melanoma Awareness Month, Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology will lead a skin cancer awareness excursion — “Melanoma, Take a Hike!” — on Sunday, May 21 at 3 p.m. at Skidaway Island State Park.

Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology

Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology

Howington and her staff will lead a three-mile hike along the park’s scenic trails, sharing facts and prevention techniques for melanoma and taking questions. Water, sunscreen and some light refreshments will be provided.

National Melanoma Skin Cancer Awareness Month, designated by the American Academy of Dermatology, is celebrated in May to raise awareness of the risk of skin cancer and increase the chances of early detection.

“For those of us who live along the southern coastline, staying out of the sun is often not practical or desirable,” Howington said. “It’s important for everyone to learn some simple but essential ways to protect their skin from the sun’s dangerous UV rays before they and their family head off to enjoy the great outdoors.”

Howington is a board-certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. She and her staff will give participants SPF30 sunscreen, which has been shown to prevent the onset of skin cancer by a whopping 80 percent.

They also will share “did you know” facts during the hike, such as:

• Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer and is the leading cause of death from skin disease.

• The American Cancer Society estimates that 87,110 new melanomas will be diagnosed this year alone and will result in 10,000 deaths.

• Rates for melanoma have been rising for the last 30 years, and melanoma accounts for nearly half of all cancers, according to the American Cancer Society.

• Although clouds block some of the sun’s skin-damaging ultraviolet radiation, as much as 80 percent still reaches the Earth’s surface.

• Anyone can develop melanoma. Skin cancer rates are lower for African Americans and Latinos than other groups, but their survival outcomes are poorer, partially because more aggressive skin cancers strike them disproportionately.

• Indications of potential skin cancer include moles or growths that are asymmetrical, have an irregular border, exhibit changes in color, have a diameter larger than the size of a pencil eraser or have evolved in size or thickness. Self-examine your skin; when caught early, melanoma is highly curable.

Tickets for the event are $35, which includes the parking fee for the park. Proceeds will benefit the Curtis & Elizabeth Anderson Cancer Institute in Savannah. Participants are asked to meet the group at Picnic Area-A after entering the park.

Tickets and more information for Melanoma, Take a Hike! Skin Cancer Awareness Excursion with Low Country Dermatology can be found at http://lcderm.com/melanoma-take-hike/

ABOUT LOW COUNTRY DERMATOLOGY
Low Country Dermatology specializes in the treatment of adult and pediatric diseases of the skin, hair and nails. Dr. Corinne Howington is a board certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. Low Country Dermatology is located at 310 Eisenhower Dr. Suite 12A Savannah, GA 31406. For more information, visit lcderm.com.

Media Contact:
Cecilia Russo
Cecilia Russo Marketing
info@crussomarketing.com
912-665-0005

The Correlation Between Stress and Skin Health

Is your skin taking a beating from stress?

by Courtney Zechman

How do you react to stress? Do you break out more, or does your rosacea flare up? Your emotions can affect your whole body and can have a powerful impact on your skin.

If your acne gets worse when you feel nervous, that’s because your body releases stress hormones, including cortisol, which tells your sebaceous glands to produce more oil. Oily skin is more prone to acne and other skin problems. Stress can also worsen problems such as psoriasis, rosacea and eczema or trigger hives and other skin rashes.

Plus, skin problems themselves can be stressful. Some people are so embarrassed by their skin that they keep to themselves, which adds more stress and only worsens the problem.

Your body expresses emotions through many nerve endings connected to the skin just as it does through other organs, causing gastrointestinal symptoms, increased anxiety or hypertension. In fact, many skin disorders take their roots from — or place their roots in — the psyche.

The relationship between the emotions and the skin has inspired a new field of study called “psychodermatology,” which examines those connections more closely than ever before. The new field evolved after scientists and medical experts determined that dermatology should have a more integrated approach with other fields such as psychology.

This thinking has widened the scope of treatment possibilities that now may include antidepressants, relaxation therapy or counseling to alleviate mood problems that might result from or cause skin problems.

You can’t avoid stress, but you can try to reduce its effects on your body, as well as battle its symptoms on the skin. That includes developing a good skin care regimen, which should incorporate beneficial skin-care products as well as these essentials:

Get enough sleep. Getting less than eight hours can cause fluid to pool below your lower eyelid area, causing puffiness. Make sure you shut off electronic devices an hour before you go to sleep and use the downtime to get calm and relaxed before bed.

Drink water. You’ll look dewy and fresh-faced if you drink eight glasses or more each day. Also consider drinking green tea for healthy antioxidants and eating fruits and vegetables with a high water content, such as cucumbers, tomatoes and celery.

Practice deep breathing. This can help calm anxiety, which can cause skin issues to flare up. Breathing exercises can also help minimize the chances of getting a rash or hives when you are stressed. These exercises can also help with flushing and redness, which can happen when you breathe in short, shallow breaths, as is often the case during stressful situations.

Stress happens to everyone, and since you can’t avoid your job, bills or life, the best thing to do is to learn to manage it. Remember to take care of your skin even if you’re tired or stressed. Get enough sleep, along with some exercise. Both are important for your skin as well as the rest of your body. Take a few minutes to do something you enjoy, like reading or a long bath.

You also might want to consider a number of stress management techniques, such as breathing exercises, yoga, meditation and visual imagery.

Once you realize how your inner turmoil shows itself, you will be better equipped to use home and professional therapies to counter its not-so-pretty effects.

Courtney Zechman, Licensed Esthetician, Low Country Dermatology

Courtney Zechman is the licensed esthetician at Low Country Dermatology, specializing in facials, SilkPeel Dermalinfusion, chemical peels, waxing, Dermaplaning, laser hair removal, and laser facial treatments. She can be reached at (912) 354-1018.

Low Country Dermatology Presents Donations to the Ronald McDonald House of the Coastal Empire

Low Country Dermatology Presents Donations to the Ronald McDonald House of the Coastal Empire

(SAVANNAH, GA) For the third consecutive year, Low Country Dermatology held a holiday donation drive to collect needed supplies for the Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) of the Coastal Empire and to help stock a “holiday store” for RMHC families. The donations were presented to Bill Sorochak, executive director of RMHC.

“The stress of having a child in the hospital is often overwhelming, and having to think about buying holiday gifts has to be the farthest thing from a parent’s mind,” said Dr. Corinne Howington, who owns Low Country Dermatology. “I’m so thankful for my patients, community and staff who brought so many items into our office. It really makes a difference.”

Items donated to the holiday store allow parents who are staying at the Ronald McDonald House to pick out presents for their children and other family members.

Collected items included: stuffed animals, bath toys, teething toys, board books and interactive toys (blocks, rattles), nerf and Fisher Price toys, board games, toy trucks, dolls and dress-up clothes, adult coloring books and colored pencils, books, snacks, high efficiency free and clear laundry detergent and dryer sheets, hand sanitizer and hand soap, disposable bowls, plates utensils and gloves, trash bags, sponges and liquid dish soap, tissues, and disinfectant wipes.

“We are dedicated to providing a ‘home away from home’ for seriously ill or injured children and their families who are receiving treatment at area hospitals,” said Sorochak. “Every donation helps ensure we can stretch the dollars that support our 13-bedroom house in Savannah to better serve the families who depend on us. We are so grateful she has stepped up year after year to help them.”

The mission of the Ronald McDonald House Charities is to create, find and support programs that enhance the health and well-being of children and families. The house operates on a waiting list most of the year. For more information, visit http://www.rmhccoastalempire.org/about-our-house.html

Low Country Dermatology is located at 310 Eisenhower Dr. Suite 12A Savannah, GA 31406. For more information, visit lcderm.com.

(LEFT TO RIGHT) Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology presents donations collected for the Ronald McDonald House to executive director Bill Sorochak

 

ABOUT LOW COUNTRY DERMATOLOGY
Low Country Dermatology specializes in the treatment of adult and pediatric diseases of the skin, hair and nails. Dr. Corinne Howington is a board certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. Low Country Dermatology is located at 310 Eisenhower Dr. Suite 12A Savannah, GA 31406. For more information, visit lcderm.com.

Media Contact:
Cecilia Russo
Cecilia Russo Marketing
info@crussomarketing.com
912-665-0005