Category: Company

Aging in Place: Ways to Update a House for Staying Long Term

Aging in Place: Ways to Update a House for Staying Long Term
By Sherry Daniel

No one likes to bring up the dreaded move that many of us fear will face us in the future. What am I referring to? Retirement homes.

No matter how improved and comfortable retirement homes may be, there’s nothing quite like living in a home in which you’ve made memories and crafted to suit your personality and needs.

With this in mind, many of our elderly neighbors are choosing to remain in their family homes rather than move to a retirement facility. To make that work smoothly, however, renovations are needed to adjust for an aging individual’s changing needs.

As the CEO and owner of Roto-Rooter Plumbers of Savannah, I notice different trends when we see an influx of specific requests. Lately, we’ve had more and more of our older customers ask for services such as height adjustments, mobility assistance installations and easier methods of accessibility in bathrooms and kitchens.

If you’re considering selling your home and moving to a retirement community, you might want to think about repairs or renovations that could make your home accessible. Below are 10 home plumbing renovations that will improve the accessibility of different parts of your house and allow you to postpone or avoid moving to a retirement home altogether.

1. Install pressure-balanced valves to provide water at steady temperatures regardless of pressure fluctuations in your kitchen and bathrooms.

2. Install grips around the shower, the toilet and your bed. Strategically located grab bars can prevent life-threatening falls. Slip-prevention flooring can help you feel secure as well.

3. Install hand-held, adjustable height, shower heads with a six-foot hose to direct the water where it’s needed.

4. Add a fold-down seat or bench in the shower. Some come with padded backs for extra comfort. Others will have a structure that extends outside the tub for easy entrance and exit.

5. Keep your spaces wide. Keep entryways, hallways and bathroom spaces clear of obstacles and wide enough for a wheelchair or other assistance device.

6. Install a toilet with the necessary height. Having the toilet at the proper height can make an incredible difference in the comfort and safety of your bathroom. A toilet paper holder designed for one-handed changing might be an added bonus.

7. Depending on your needs, a toilet/bidet combination can significantly improve hygiene.

8. Walk-in tubs and roll-in showers are imperative for those with mobility inhibitors. A roll-in shower is a shower stall that has a curb-less entrance and the door (or opening) is a minimum of 36 inches wide.

9. Consider a wheelchair accessible sink that is hung on the wall to leave space for your knees (or wheelchair) beneath a pipe-covering panel to protect your legs. You can also install lever handle faucets or faucets that are pedal controlled.

10. Install adjustable height (or varying height) counter tops with provisions for roll-under access in front of the sink and main counter top.

Taking advantage of these 10 tips can make your bathrooms wheelchair or simply “aging” accessible. Making these renovations can extend the amount of time you can live safely in your family home.

Sherry Daniel is the owner and CEO of Roto-Rooter Plumbers of Savannah. Roto-Rooter Plumbers of Savannah is headquartered at 2016 E Broad St, Savannah, GA 31401. The main office line is 912-355-1287 and you may contact Sherry Daniel directly at 912-629-1646. The local website is http://www.rotosavannah.com/

Sherry Daniel, Roto Rooter Plumbers of Savannah

Sherry Daniel, Roto Rooter Plumbers of Savannah

 

 

Advertisements

EquipmentShare Breaks Ground on New Rental Equipment Facility in Richmond Hill

EquipmentShare Breaks Ground on New Rental Equipment Facility in Richmond Hill

(RICHMOND HILL, GA) EquipmentShare, a national equipment rental business, broke ground on a new facility, located at 145 Thunderbird Dr., Richmond Hill, GA. This facility will be used as an equipment rental facility, as well as, one of their installation centers for their Tech company, Equipment Share Track. The Dewitt Tilton Group is the contractor for the project.

The Dewitt Tilton Group Breaks Ground on First GA Location for EquipmentShare

CAPTION: LEFT TO RIGHT: Jonathan Miller, Director of Construction (EquipmentShare); Billy Meadows, Territory Manager (EquipmentShare); David Brown, Director of Business Development (EquipmentShare); Matt Hicks, General Manager (EquipmentShare); Chris Tilton (The Dewitt Tilton Group); Kim Thomas (The Dewitt Tilton Group); Councilman Bill Donahue (Richmond Hill); Suzanne Meadows (The Trisha Cook Team of Keller Williams Realty)

“This is a build-to-suit project for our client, and it will be the first location in Georgia for EquipmentShare, where the closest existing locations are Charleston and Jacksonville,” said Chris Tilton, one of the principals of the Savannah-based construction firm.

EquipmentShare is a contractor-focused equipment rental business, giving contractors access to an extensive construction fleet. The company also offers technology solutions and other services to the contracting field. Founded in 2014, it operates 26 facilities in 11 states.

Construction is expected to be complete on EquipmentShare’s new building late this year or in January 2020. The facility will feature 20-foot eave heights, six 16’ tall garage doors, washing bay, office space and fully fenced equipment yard.

MORE INFORMATION ON DEWITT TILTON GROUP
The Dewitt Tilton Group, a premier construction firm located in Savannah, Ga., specializes in commercial construction. The principals, Andrew Dewitt and Chris Tilton, have over 50 years of combined experience in the local construction industry. The firm manages every aspect of a commercial project from pre-construction to the final walk through. Known for using only highly reputable contractors, the Dewitt Tilton Group brings to the table design, engineering and construction capabilities which guarantees a smooth construction process for each client. The firm is located at 2807-A Roger Lacey Avenue, Savannah, GA 31404. For more information or to contact the Dewitt Tilton Group, please call 912.777.3404 or visit www.dewitttiltongroup.com

CORPORATE OFFICE
Jon Miller
Director – Construction and Development
(423) 402-7270
jon.miller@equipmentshare.com

CONTACT
Kim Thomas
Dewitt Tilton Group
912-777-3404
kim@dewitttiltongroup.com

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck
Carriage Trade Public Relations®, Inc.
Cecilia Russo Marketing
cynthia@carriagetradepr.com
912.856.9075

What it Takes to be a Successful Woman in the Field of Architecture

What it Takes to be a Successful Woman in the Field of Architecture
By Gretchen Callejas

Frank Lloyd Wright. I.M. Pei. Those are the familiar names of two of America’s best-known architects.

Wright’s distinct prairie-style homes dot the American landscape while Pei’s large but elegantly designed urban buildings and complexes are among the world’s most famous architectural works. Pei’s projects, among others, include the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the controversial glass pyramid in Paris’ Louvre Museum courtyard.

But have you heard of Julia Morgan, who designed California’s famous Hearst Castle? Or trailblazers such as Marion Mahony Griffin, the first woman to be officially licensed as an architect, and Zaha Hadid, the first woman to win the Pritzker Architecture Prize?

It isn’t surprising if you haven’t. According to a January 2019 article in ThoughtCo., which listed 20 famous female architects, the role that women have played in architecture and design often go under the radar.

While architecture has been a male-dominated field, that is not the case at Felder & Associates, where I have worked since its inception in 2012. We have four women and three men on staff. The forward-thinking leadership of the firm’s managing principal, Brian Felder, has played an extraordinary part in making our workplace a gender free oasis in an otherwise industry-wide testosterone-filled desert.

Why is architecture, like so many other professions, such a tough profession for women to crack?

According to a 2016 article in the Los Angeles Times, only 18 percent of licensed practitioners are women although they make up nearly half of U.S. architecture school graduates. This disparity sometimes is referred to as “the missing 32 percent.” Unfortunately, females leave the field in disturbingly high numbers after they’re confronted with lower salaries, given fewer career-building opportunities or find a lack of mentors, who champion for them.

Full-time female architects earn 20 percent less than their male counterparts, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Plus, architecture’s history as a male-dominated profession has contributed to an all-consuming workplace culture that leaves little flexibility for women expected to balance work and family. According to the Times article, 75 percent of female survey respondents had experienced sexual discrimination on the job, and 83 percent believed having a child would hurt their careers.

My personal observations and experiences have confirmed some of these disparities, but I consider myself lucky.

Fortunately, I’ve been able to maintain a successful professional career while balancing family because I have a husband who shares responsibilities and encouragement. Without his support, it would be more challenging to continue with a professional career.

And while I have quite a few female friends who are architects, I have never worked for a woman nor had a strong female mentor. Contractors and clients often assume I need to ask my male boss for help in understanding construction, codes or a design issue. When I approach a problem with the same assertiveness as a male architect, I’m sometimes labeled with the “B”-word.

Since I was a kid, I dreamed of designing buildings before I knew what that encompassed. And now as an adult would I encourage young girls to enter architecture? Absolutely. I would tell young women (and men) entering the field that determination and passion go a long way. You will be successful if you work hard, tune out the negativity and chase your goals with perseverance. If you want to be an Architect, then go be one.

I finally believe that I am in a position to give them a hand. I’ve been around enough to help guide them and try to be the mentor I never had. I’m pleased we have two young women working with us at Felder & Associates. Alma Johnson and Cathryn Sinclair graduated with architectural degrees from the Savannah College of Art and Design last year and are interning with us as project associates.

Sinclair says she believes the playing field is more level than ever before but there is always room for improvement.

“I hope to continue to see the gap close,” she says.

For Johnson, success is based on how hard you work.

“Now, the gender gap does exist, but I think that the world is evolving on a more modern idea of a woman in the workplace. I don’t see gender. I see what skill sets I need to acquire to be as successful as the candidate next to me,” Johnson says.

I hope their perspectives will remain true and their positivity high after spending 15 years or so in the industry. I suspect they will reflect on their early days as a time when they had to deal with an old and outdated set of standards.

One thing I know for certain. They are in a wonderful setting to avoid bias and discrimination working at Felder & Associates. We are, thankfully, treated equally regardless of our gender, and we treat one another with mutual respect and understanding.

My hope for young women in architecture is that they will continue to mentor the next generations of women architects, have equal opportunities and respect. One day we will be as well-known as Frank Lloyd Wright and I.M. Pei.

Gretchen Callejas is a project architect at Felder & Associates, where she specializes in historic preservation, adaptive reuse, small scale commercial architecture and high-end residential design. She is also LEED-accredited from the U.S. Green Building Council. Callejas earned Bachelor of Architecture and Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design from Ball State University and a Master of Fine Arts in Historic Preservation from Savannah College of Art and Design.

 

Gretchen Callejas
Felder & Associates

Contact:
Gretchen Callejas
Email: gretchen@felderassociates.net
Phone: 912-777-3979
Website: www.felderassociates.net

Citations:

1. Craven, Jackie (2019, January). 20 Famous Women Architects. ThoughtCo. Retrieved from: https://www.thoughtco.com/famous-female-architects-177890

2. Stratigakos, Despina (2016, April). Why is the world of architecture so male-dominated? LA Times. Retrieved from: https://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-stratigakos-missing-women-architects-20160421-story.html

3. Newman, Caroline (2019, January). Three Generations Of Female Architects Seek To Bring More Women Into The Profession. UVA Today. Retrieved from: https://news.virginia.edu/content/3-generations-female-architects-seek-bring-more-women-profession

Nine Tips To Develop A Social Media Crisis Strategy

Nine Tips To Develop A Social Media Crisis Strategy
By Cynthia Cradduck

It’s clear that business owners no longer can ignore the impact and significance of integrating social media into their overall marketing plan. A great deal of thought is devoted to choosing which channels to use, creating a cohesive voice and crafting creative content.

Cynthia Cradduck, Junior Partner of Carriage Trade Public Relations and Cecilia Russo Marketing_

Cynthia Cradduck

Equal attention should be given to planning for social media crises that can happen quickly and escalate even more quickly.

Don’t worry, though. The following nine-step guide will help you prepare for and survive a social media crisis of any kind.

Before a Crisis

1. Establish a social media crisis team.

Not everyone in your business needs to be part of this group, but everyone who’s included should have a defined role. Who will be responsible for monitoring online for potential crises? Who will be the spokesperson if things do go awry? Who will be responsible for responding to online comments? All of these roles must be filled with individuals who know what defines a crisis and how to handle it.

2. Define what constitutes a social media crisis for your business.

Larger corporations may ignore a few hundred complaints, but those complaints could be devastating for small businesses. When social media chatter begins to have a negative effect on your services or products, something must be done.

3. Identify your key message and create communication guidelines.

Because crises are unpredictable, your brand’s central message will need to be defined when you understand the root issue of what’s happening. To be prepared, your entire team should understand the company’s values and missions. These should guide whatever response the crisis calls for. It is important to establish guidelines for relaying all necessary information to your employees, stakeholders and the public.

Knowing who needs to know what, using which platforms, will allow you to respond quickly when fire strikes.

4. Monitor. Monitor. Monitor.

You’ll never catch a crisis soon enough if you’re not constantly monitoring online for negative messages circulating about your company. Decide which tools you will use to do this and who’s responsible. “Social Mention” is a great resource to keep an eye on your company and/or your clients in the social media sphere.

During a Crisis

5. Take control.

Pause your scheduled posts. After you ensure no outgoing posts will be published for the moment to any of your pages, you should follow by informing your team of the situation and acknowledging the problem publicly. Remember to address the issue on your website as well.

6. Determine the Key Message.
Assessing the situation and developing a key message that is understood by everyone on your team is critical. This should be a strategic message that will guide the rest of the crisis. Using appropriate words to describe the situation effectively is a must, and everyone should agree to relay this message to anyone who might ask. “No answer” is not sufficient.

7. Respond to the Public.
Don’t ignore the situation or members of the public who are upset. Ask them to contact you privately by offering an email address or a number they can call. This tells everyone who is looking at these messages that your brand truly cares. Continue to monitor the messaging and continue to work your plan. This is when it’s important to remember you can weather the storm.

After a Crisis

8. Assess the impact.

Evaluate your company’s status. Your social monitoring tool will indicate the overall sentiment about your company and its standing on social media. Did the crisis result in tangible setbacks? Take time to study the damage that has been done.

9. Reflect and prepare.

Take a minute to reflect and decide what went well and what parts of your crisis plan need improvement. And remember that online content lives forever and may resurface later.

It’s worth remembering, too, that no one is exempt. Even if your social channels have a small following and a social media crisis seems unlikely, a plan to guide you through potential chaos should be in place at all times.

I think we all can agree that people sometimes get a little crazy online.

Good luck out there.

Cynthia Cradduck is the Junior Partner at Carriage Trade Public Relations and Cecilia Russo Marketing, where she oversees business development, manages the Visibility Team, and coordinates reputation management strategies for clients, media relations and online SEO-PR.

Trinity Worship and Praise Ministries Breaks Ground on New Sanctuary

Trinity Worship and Praise Ministries Breaks Ground on New Sanctuary

(SAVANNAH, GA) Trinity Worship and Praise Ministries broke ground on a new sanctuary on the existing church campus at 12532 White Bluff Road.

The Dewitt Tilton Group Breaks Ground on New Worship Center

“The entire congregation shares a great excitement about this next step in our ministry, and my wife, Shirley, and I were excited to prayerfully begin construction of a building we hope will be a blessing to this church and our community,” said Pastor Larry Pounds.

Paul McKelvey, Church Maintenance and Photography; Anthony McLeod, Church Volunteer; Derrick Pounds, Pastor’s Assistant; Lynn Pierce, Deacon; Shirley Pounds, Pastor’s Wife; Larry Pounds, Pastor; Chris Tilton, Principal​,​ the Dewitt Tilton Group; Andrew DeWitt, Principal​, ​the Dewitt Tilton Group; Kim Thomas, Director of Operations​,​ ​the ​Dewitt Tilton Group; Cedric Collins, Church Musician.

The Dewitt Tilton Group is the contractor for the project, which will build a new 200-person capacity sanctuary for the church. The 4,500-square-foot structure will feature a stage, a vaulted ceiling, restrooms, private office for the pastor, three additional offices and a future baptismal location. The new building will share the church campus with the existing church and other support buildings.

Construction is expected to be complete sometime in December 2019.

“At the Dewitt Tilton Group, we construct a wide variety of buildings for a wide range of clients,” said Chris Tilton, one of two principals at the Dewitt Tilton Group. “But there’s always an extra bit of pride associated with working on a church, knowing how much it will impact so many lives once it is completed.”

MORE INFORMATION ON DEWITT TILTON GROUP
The Dewitt Tilton Group, a premier construction firm located in Savannah, Ga., specializes in commercial construction. The principals, Andrew Dewitt and Chris Tilton, have over 50 years of combined experience in the local construction industry. The firm manages every aspect of a commercial project from pre-construction to the final walk through. Known for using only highly reputable contractors, the Dewitt Tilton Group brings to the table design, engineering and construction capabilities which guarantees a smooth construction process for each client. The firm is located at 2807-A Roger Lacey Avenue, Savannah, GA 31404. For more information or to contact the Dewitt Tilton Group, please call 912.777.3404 or visit www.dewitttiltongroup.com

CONTACT
Kim Thomas
Dewitt Tilton Group
912-777-3404
kim@dewitttiltongroup.com

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck
Carriage Trade Public Relations®, Inc.
Cecilia Russo Marketing
cynthia@carriagetradepr.com
912.856.9075

Beaufort Dermatology Reopens Under New Management

Beaufort Dermatology Reopens Under New Management

(BEAUFORT, SOUTH CAROLINA) Pinnacle Medical Group cut the ribbon on its newest location, Beaufort Dermatology, located at 1096 Ribaut Road.

A crowd gathers to cut the ribbon on Beaufort Dermatology in celebration of the new ownership under Pinnacle Medical Group. Left to right: Melody Jones, Pinnacle Medical Group; Beaufort Councilman Philip Cromer; Beaufort Councilwoman Alice Howard; Blakely Williams, President and CEO of the Beaufort Chamber of Commerce; Trevor Klenke, Pinnacle Medical Group; Dr. Audrey Klenke, Pinnacle Medical Group; Beaufort Mayor Billy Keyserling; Jo Ann Cullen, Beaufort Dermatology; Anissa Stark, Beaufort Dermatology; Jose Casey, Field Representative for Congressman Joe Cunningham South Carolina First District; Savanna Dorsey, Beaufort Dermatology; Aylin Flores, Beaufort Dermatology; Jessica Fico, Beaufort Dermatology; Crystal Robinson, Beaufort Dermatology; Susan Fogelman, Beaufort Chamber of Commerce.

The practice’s parent company brings the latest in technology to the region, including the ability to diagnose skin cancer non-invasively.

The Chamber of Commerce and the Mayor Stand by Co-Owners Trevor and Dr. Audrey Klenke of Beaufort Dermatology, Pinnacle Medical Group

Dr. Audrey Klenke, the plastic surgeon who owns and leads the parent company of Beaufort Dermatology, Pinnacle Medical Group, was on hand for the festivities. Joining her were Beaufort Mayor Billy Keyserling, Beaufort councilman Philip E. Cromer, Beaufort Councilwoman Alice Howard, Jose Casey, Field Representative for Congressman Joe Cunningham South Carolina First District, Beaufort Regional Chamber of Commerce representatives and Trevor Klenke, Dr. Klenke’s husband.

Pinnacle Medical Group is delighted to keep this medical specialty available in Beaufort, where our outdoor lifestyle makes skin health a matter of such critical importance,” Dr. Klenke told the audience. “Plus, we are able to offer elegant spa services at this site in addition to critical dermatology services.”

Klenke acquired the original practice from two retiring dermatologists and added it to Pinnacle Medical Group’s holdings, which include Pinnacle Plastic Surgery and PURE Medical Spa in Bluffton, South Carolina.

A full-time dermatologist will join the practice after a national search is completed. Meanwhile, Jo Ann Cullen, an advanced practice nurse practitioner, will serve as the physician extender. Assisting her will be medical assistants Aylin Flores and Jessica Fico and patient concierge, Katie Bruns.

After the brief ribbon-cutting ceremony, the audience was invited to tour the practice where they could see new skin cancer technology such as the Vivascope 1500, which allows a diagnosis to be made without removing any tissue. Pinnacle is the only practice in the area to offer this option.

“Less invasive approaches to testing and treatment are on the medical forefront, and dermatology is no exception,” said Cullen. “With this device, we’ll be able to determine whether a suspicious skin feature is cancerous or just calls for careful monitoring. That means less pain, less expense and less likelihood of unnecessary scarring.”

After the tours, guests were offered discounts on Beaufort Dermatology’s retail products and spa services.

ABOUT THE PINNACLE MEDICAL GROUP 
The Pinnacle Medical Group is the locally owned and operated parent company of Pinnacle Plastic Surgery, PURE Medical Spa and Beaufort Dermatology. Principal, Dr. Audrey Klenke is the only board-certified female plastic surgeon in Beaufort County, South Carolina, and is affiliated with multiple outpatient centers in the area as well as Beaufort Memorial Hospital and Hilton Head Hospital. Pinnacle Plastic Surgery and PURE Medical Spa are located at 7 Mallet Way, Bluffton, SC 29910. Beaufort Dermatology is located at 1096 Ribaut Road, Beaufort, SC 29902. For more information, please call (843) 815-6699, or visit http://pinnaclemd.com/ and http://www.beaufortdermatology.com/.

MEDIA CONTACT
Melody Jones
Sales & Marketing Specialist
Pinnacle Medical Group
7 Mallett Way, Bluffton, SC 29910
p: 843.815.6699 ext. 1009
f: 843.815.6695
mjones@pinnaclemd.com
www.PinnacleMD.com

Enmarket and Healthy Savannah Present $1,000 to Park Place Outreach and Host Service Day

Enmarket and Healthy Savannah Present $1,000 to Park Place Outreach and Host Serive Day

(SAVANNAH, GA) Enmarket and Healthy Savannah presented $1,000 to Park Place Outreach – Youth Emergency Services as part of the 2019 Enmarket Encourage Health Series. The check presentation was followed by a service day at the Park Place Outreach house with volunteers from Enmarket.

Enmarket Encourage Health Series Park Place Outreach Volunteer Day and Check Presentation

Park Place Outreach is one of four area non-profit organizations that will receive a $1,000 grant as part of the 2019 series. Park Place Outreach- Youth Emergency Services supports runaway, homeless, and at-risk young people, ages 11-21, through residential and after-school programs.

Enmarket representatives volunteered at the House in the sun garden by planting fresh herbs and cleaning up the yard and sidewalks.

Enmarket Volunteers at Park Place Outreach for Encourage Health Program

This marks the sixth year for the Enmarket Encourage Health Education Series sponsored by Healthy Savannah, St. Joseph’s/Candler, Clover Health, Sandfly Family Dental, the Charles H. Morris Center at Trustees’ Garden, Cha Bella, the City of Savannah, Savannah Morning News, Savannah Magazine and WRHQ.

ABOUT ENMARKET 
Enmarket, founded as Interstate Stations by Robert Demere in 1963, is part of Savannah-based Colonial Group, Inc. The retailer operates convenience stores in Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina and was noted as the industry’s “Biggest Mover” in store count ranking by Convenience Store News in 2018. The company is committed to giving back to the community through many charitable contributions and volunteer efforts, offering fresh food, healthy snacks, and competitively priced quality fuel as part of its mission to enrich life. Enmarket currently employs more than 1,200 people and operates 124 convenience stores and 14 quick-serve restaurants as the 54th largest convenience store operator in the country. www.enmarket.com

MEDIA CONTACT 
Matt Clements
Vice President, Marketing
Enmarket
MClements@enmarket.com