Category: Article

Carriage Trade Public Relations Announces August Open for Business®: Does Your Pitch Pass the Test?

Carriage Trade Public Relations Announces August Open for Business®: Does Your Pitch Pass the Test?

(SAVANNAH, GA) Join Carriage Trade Public Relations®, Inc. for the August session of their monthly Open for Business® series. This month’s topic is focused on pitching and how to improve yours. Cynthia Cradduck, Junior Partner, will host the conversation on Wednesday, August 28, at noon.

Open for Business® is a monthly online social media article review series, where current marketing articles are discussed that will help your business become more competitive. It is held on the last Wednesday of every month at noon via Facebook Live on Carriage Trade Public Relations’ account.

The article this month can be found here: http://www.publicrelationstoday.com/pitching/?open-article-id=9999286&article-title=does-your-pitch-pass-the-5-second-skim-test-&blog-domain=prsa.org&blog-title=prsay

For more information, visit https://www.facebook.com/events/441614443102931/

ABOUT CARRIAGE TRADE PUBLIC RELATIONS®, INC.
Carriage Trade Public Relations, Inc. is Savannah’s premier reputation management company. Founded in 1995 by Marjorie Young to help businesses increase their visibility in their community and globally online through its trademarked strategy, the REPUTATION MATRIX™ method.

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Cradduck
Junior Partner
912.856.9075
savannahpublicrelations@gmail.com

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Nine Tips To Develop A Social Media Crisis Strategy

Nine Tips To Develop A Social Media Crisis Strategy
By Cynthia Cradduck

It’s clear that business owners no longer can ignore the impact and significance of integrating social media into their overall marketing plan. A great deal of thought is devoted to choosing which channels to use, creating a cohesive voice and crafting creative content.

Cynthia Cradduck, Junior Partner of Carriage Trade Public Relations and Cecilia Russo Marketing_

Cynthia Cradduck

Equal attention should be given to planning for social media crises that can happen quickly and escalate even more quickly.

Don’t worry, though. The following nine-step guide will help you prepare for and survive a social media crisis of any kind.

Before a Crisis

1. Establish a social media crisis team.

Not everyone in your business needs to be part of this group, but everyone who’s included should have a defined role. Who will be responsible for monitoring online for potential crises? Who will be the spokesperson if things do go awry? Who will be responsible for responding to online comments? All of these roles must be filled with individuals who know what defines a crisis and how to handle it.

2. Define what constitutes a social media crisis for your business.

Larger corporations may ignore a few hundred complaints, but those complaints could be devastating for small businesses. When social media chatter begins to have a negative effect on your services or products, something must be done.

3. Identify your key message and create communication guidelines.

Because crises are unpredictable, your brand’s central message will need to be defined when you understand the root issue of what’s happening. To be prepared, your entire team should understand the company’s values and missions. These should guide whatever response the crisis calls for. It is important to establish guidelines for relaying all necessary information to your employees, stakeholders and the public.

Knowing who needs to know what, using which platforms, will allow you to respond quickly when fire strikes.

4. Monitor. Monitor. Monitor.

You’ll never catch a crisis soon enough if you’re not constantly monitoring online for negative messages circulating about your company. Decide which tools you will use to do this and who’s responsible. “Social Mention” is a great resource to keep an eye on your company and/or your clients in the social media sphere.

During a Crisis

5. Take control.

Pause your scheduled posts. After you ensure no outgoing posts will be published for the moment to any of your pages, you should follow by informing your team of the situation and acknowledging the problem publicly. Remember to address the issue on your website as well.

6. Determine the Key Message.
Assessing the situation and developing a key message that is understood by everyone on your team is critical. This should be a strategic message that will guide the rest of the crisis. Using appropriate words to describe the situation effectively is a must, and everyone should agree to relay this message to anyone who might ask. “No answer” is not sufficient.

7. Respond to the Public.
Don’t ignore the situation or members of the public who are upset. Ask them to contact you privately by offering an email address or a number they can call. This tells everyone who is looking at these messages that your brand truly cares. Continue to monitor the messaging and continue to work your plan. This is when it’s important to remember you can weather the storm.

After a Crisis

8. Assess the impact.

Evaluate your company’s status. Your social monitoring tool will indicate the overall sentiment about your company and its standing on social media. Did the crisis result in tangible setbacks? Take time to study the damage that has been done.

9. Reflect and prepare.

Take a minute to reflect and decide what went well and what parts of your crisis plan need improvement. And remember that online content lives forever and may resurface later.

It’s worth remembering, too, that no one is exempt. Even if your social channels have a small following and a social media crisis seems unlikely, a plan to guide you through potential chaos should be in place at all times.

I think we all can agree that people sometimes get a little crazy online.

Good luck out there.

Cynthia Cradduck is the Junior Partner at Carriage Trade Public Relations and Cecilia Russo Marketing, where she oversees business development, manages the Visibility Team, and coordinates reputation management strategies for clients, media relations and online SEO-PR.

March Open for Business®: The Four Stages of Social Media Issue and Crisis Management

March Open for Business®: The Four Stages of Social Media Issue and Crisis Management

(SAVANNAH, GA) Join Carriage Trade Public Relations®, Inc. for the March session of their monthly Open for Business® series. This month’s topic is the importance of issue and crisis management on social media, and Cynthia Cradduck, Junior Partner, will host the conversation.

Open for Business

The interview takes place via Facebook Liveon Wednesday, March 27, at 10:30 A.M. Interested parties can find more information here: https://www.facebook.com/events/417320049002245/

Open for Business® is a monthly online social media article review series, where current marketing articles are discussed that will help your business become more competitive. It is held on the last Wednesday of every month at noon via Facebook Live.

ABOUT CARRIAGE TRADE PUBLIC RELATIONS®, INC.
Carriage Trade Public Relations, Inc. is Savannah’s premiere reputation management company. Founded in 1995 by Marjorie Young to help businesses increase their visibility in their community and globally online through its trademarked strategy, the REPUTATION MATRIX™ method.

MEDIA CONTACT
Elizabeth Poole
912.695.4791
savannahpublicrelations@gmail.com

Creating Good Dental Habits at an Early Age by Angela C. Canfield, DDS

Creating Good Dental Habits at an Early Age
by Angela C. Canfield, DDS

It’s always a good time to think about the health of your children’s teeth. The routines you set in stone now will carry your children into adulthood and set the stage for healthy teeth.

When it comes to those teeth, a tried-and-true parental friend comes in handy: routine. Brushing and flossing should be a part of your child’s daily routine in the morning and before bed.

But additional routines are needed too. I’m talking about a twice-a-year dental checkup. You don’t want a dental visit to become a time of trauma and dread because of a dental emergency. A positive, cheerful visit with a dentist who understands children’s needs and is experienced in dealing with them should be as much a part of a child’s life as checkups with a pediatrician, back-to-school supply shopping or a photo with Santa.

For parents who want to build dental care into their children’s lifelong habits, the American Dental Association’s consumer website, mouthhealthy.org, can be a useful tool. It isn’t a preachy site full of boring demands to brush, brush, brush. It has helpful, real-world advice that parents can put to good use. The section with suggestions on tooth fairy visits almost reminds me of a sort of Pinterestfor teeth.

Someday, your child will be a senior, not just a high school senior, but much, much later, a senior as in “senior citizen.” Whether that future senior citizen is eating with his or her own teeth 75 years from now has a lot to do with what you are teaching your child right now.

You wouldn’t take any aspect of your child’s health for granted, but some parents overlook the fact that dental health is health. Sometimes, a special promotion like National Children’s Dental Health Month is a good reminder to make sure your children have a healthy dental routine.

Angela Canfield DDS

Angela Canfield DDS

Dr. Angela Canfield is licensed by the Georgia Board of Dentistry and the National Board of Dentist. She owns and practices at two dental offices: Premier Dental Designs (www.premierdentaldesigns.com/located in Rincon, GA, and Sandfly Family Dental (https://www.sandflyfamilydental.com/) in Savannah, GA. Contact Dr. Canfield at molar799@yahoo.comor 912-826-4037

SEDA Entertainment Incentives Extended for Three Years: How to Make it Work for You

SEDA Entertainment Incentives Extended for Three Years: How to Make it Work for You
By Charles Bowen

Charles Bowen

Charles Bowen

Savannah did not become a preferred filming destination based solely upon Mother Nature’s bounty. While warm weather, beaches, forests, creeks, and marshes (not to mention some of the most beautiful architecture on the planet) can offer up a feast to any camera’s lens, the truth is that the lifeblood of the film industry is illusion. One room with a simple green wall can be instantly transformed into any location in the universe. Thus, despite the breathtaking nature beauty of the Coastal Empire, continued success will not be assured by our looks alone.

Movies and television shows can be insightful, inspirational, and uplifting. They have the ability to mentally transport the viewer to another time and place and have motivated some of the greatest leaders of our generation. But first and foremost, they are also a business. That means that money counts. A lot.

The State of Georgiahas become one of the top filming locations in the world due to the generous film tax credits offered by the Georgia Department of Economic Development. Those financial incentives are why the dead walk in Senoia, Georgia and the Black Panther’s homeland of Wakanda has an Atlanta ZIP code.

While that is great for the state as a whole, what about Savannah? That is where the Savannah Entertainment Production Incentive comes into play. The Savannah Economic Development Authority(SEDA) has just approved a three-year renewal of this unique set of financial incentives for movie and television productions.

Thanks to SEDA, Savannah became the first city in the state to add additional benefits on top of Georgia’s already generous incentives. These local incentives provide $4 million to qualifying film and television productions that shoot in Savannah. They have also earmarked $100,000.00 of that total for professional auditing to ensure that the guidelines are being followed by the recipients.

So how do these incentives benefit local businesses? In the broad economic picture, everyone in the region indirectly profits due to the boost that productions provide the local economy. Movie and television productions directly spent more than $120 million dollars in the Savannah area in 2018, which equates (according to the experts) to a total economic impact of over $250 million. Landlords, florists, security firms, antiques dealers, equipment rental firms, hoteliers, restaurateurs, and many other industries all shared in that windfall.

If you would like to apply for the incentive directly, however, you must be planning a feature film or television pilot with a budget of at least $2 million with at least $500,000.00 of that amount being spent on approved expenditures within Chatham County. Productions that meet those requirements can qualify for a 10 percent rebate on qualified local spending up to a cap of $100,000.00. Television series have higher budgetary requirements but the annual cap goes up to $250,000.00.

The precise guidelines may be found on the Savannah Regional Film Commission’s website, savannahfilm.org. The incentives previously applied only to Chatham County but now cover any filming within a 60-mile radius of Savannah City Hall.

It should also be noted that SEDAis providing economic incentives to help build the local crew base, as no production would be possible without the myriad of individuals working diligently behind the scenes. If you have five years of verifiable experience as a film or television technician and would like to relocate to Chatham County, the local incentive will reimburse up to $2,000.00 per household for qualified moving expenses. The current budget allocates up to $100,000.00 per year on these crew relocations. That is enough for fifty crew members per year to move to Savannah, helping ensure that producers can find the local crew they need. Even better, the production itself can qualify for a bonus incentive if 50 percent of its official crew is hired locally.

Given the tremendous advantage that Atlanta has over Savannah in terms of both population and infrastructure, Atlanta will likely always remain the top filmmaking destination in Georgia. Indeed, Atlanta showed up No. 2 on MovieMaker Magazine’s January 2019 list of the best major cities for making movies. Savannah, however, claimed the No. 1 spot on that same magazine’s list of best small cities and towns for film and television production. This is a tremendous testament to the hard work of all the individuals in the Savannah Regional Film Commission, SEDA, and the countless other individuals and companies that have tirelessly and diligently labored to help build the Savannah film and television industry.

If your business has benefitted from the entertainment industry, or even if you just enjoy the thrill of wondering whether that person at the corner table in your favorite coffee shop is a movie star who has slipped away from the bright lights, a great deal of the credit goes to the Savannah Entertainment Production Incentive.

Charles Bowen is an entertainment attorney and founder of the Savannah Film Alliance. He may be contacted at 912.544.2050 or cbowen@thebowenlawgroup.com

The Greatest Year Ever for Savannah’s Film and Television Industry

The Greatest Year Ever for Savannah’s Film and Television Industry
By Charles J. Bowen

Charles Bowen

Charles Bowen

What do an aging assassin hunting his clone, a football-playing private investigator trying to exonerate his daughter, an escaped slave interacting with famous historical figures, and an upper-class cocker spaniel falling in love with a street smart mutt all have in common? They are all leading characters in movies filmed in Savannah in 2018.

These films do not even begin to demonstrate the breadth of last year’s film and television industry in Savannah. From film noir in John Travolta’s “The Poison Rose” to the science fiction action thriller “Gemini Man” starring Will Smith to Disney’s live-action remake of “Lady and the Tramp,” Savannah has played host to almost every possible genre of production.

Over 200 professional film and television productions were filmed in the Savannah area in 2018 with another 147 student productions on top of that. Whether large or small, each and every production served as an economic engine pumping cash into every corner of the local economy.

According to the Savannah Regional Film Commission, these productions accounted for $120 million in direct spending locally and had a total economic impact of well over $250 million in 2018 alone. These figures shattered the record set in 2017 of $65 million in direct spending with $138 million in total local economic impact.

As founder of the Savannah Film Alliance, I see the tremendous financial impact these productions have daily on a diverse range of local businesses. In addition to food and lodging, film crews utilize dry cleaners, pet sitters, massage therapists, and countless other local professionals. Small businesses across the city are finding a windfall in income from these productions, and every month, more and more businesses that service the entertainment industry are moving to town.

One of the major reasons for this boom in the local film and television industry is the Savannah Entertainment Production Incentive offered by the Savannah Economic Development Authority. This program provides cash rebates to qualified film and television productions that schedule a majority of their shooting days within 60 miles of Savannah City Hall. Since this rebate applies to local spending only, it encourages productions to hire local crew and utilize local businesses and service providers.

The reason this incentive is so effective is that it is offered on top of the very generous production incentives offered statewide by the State of Georgia. But all this government support would mean nothing without the many local crew members, small business owners, industry leaders, and educators, such as the Georgia Film Academyat Savannah Tech, that have worked tirelessly to transform Savannah into one of the most popular filming destinations in the world.

While these statistics are certainly reasons to celebrate, it is crucial to remember that all of this progress can be instantly destroyed by one ill-informed swipe of our new governor’s pen. As North Carolina discovered after its infamous “bathroom bill,” any effort to roll back the civil rights gains of the last 60-plus years under the guise of “religious liberty” could decimate Georgia’s film and television industry. Just last year, a bill that would have allowed private adoption agencies to legally discriminate based on “sincerely-held religious beliefs” made it all the way through the Georgia Senate before failing. Thus, it is important to remain vigilant lest any such efforts resurface.

Looking forward to 2019, Savannah looks well-positioned to hold onto its status as the second most filmed city in Georgia behind Atlanta. Numerous productions have either committed to or expressed interest in filming in Savannah this year. Remember, there is a lot more at stake than simply the chance to spot a movie star at a local restaurant or to recognize a familiar site on the screen. Entire livelihoods and real money supporting real families are being built by the local film and television industry and you never know where the flow of that money will ultimately land.

While recently browsing a local antique mall, well-removed from the lights-camera-action world, a friend ran across a prop master buying rotary phones for the 2019 local filming of “The Glorias: A Life on the Road,” a Gloria Steinem biopic. The film dollar travels far and wide. The pocket in which it winds up may well be yours.

 

Charles Bowen is an entertainment attorney and founder of the Savannah Film Alliance. He may be contacted at 912.544.2050or cbowen@thebowenlawgroup.com